• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Plant-Bird Relationship: 2. List of plants (version 2.0)

02 Jul 2015   in Plants, References, Reports 2 Comments »
Contributed by YC Wee
The 349 species of plants are listed under algae, mosses, lichens, ferns, non-seed and seed plants. Non-seed plants (Gymnosperms) and seed plants (Angiosperms) are further listed under their different families arranged in alphabetical order. Under each plant species are the different species of birds that had been documented visiting it for shelter, food (nectar, fruit or insect), nesting materials and nest sites. References are provided to allow for tracing to their... Read More

Plant-Bird Relationship: 1. Introduction

01 Jul 2015   in Plants, References, Reports 1 Comment »
Contributed by YC Wee
Plant-Bird Relationship: 1. Introduction In the next three days we will be making available on this website three major documents on plant-bird relationship. [feeding on nectar, from left (bird-plant): Crimson Sunbird-Etlingera elatior, Javan Myna-Schefflera actinophylla, Yellow-naped Oriole-Schefflera actinophylla] 1. The first is a list of 349 species of plants that birds visit to obtain shelter, food, nest material, nesting site, etc. 2. The second is a list of 230 species of birds. Listed under each bird... Read More

Pin-striped Tit-babbler: 3. Nest structure

30 Jun 2015   in Nests 1 Comment »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Pin-striped Tit-babbler: 3. Nest structure “I returned to this nest of the Pin-striped Tit-babbler (Macronous gularis), I had previously reported LINK and LINK, when I was sure the babblers had fledged. I spent 2 hours of observations around the nest, of up to 50 meters distance, to make sure the birds had left. “I then approached the nest to get some detailed observations (measurements not available locally). I carefully striped away the covering vegetation and the globular nest could now be clearly seen. The... Read More

Pin-striped Tit-babbler: 2. Food for the chicks

29 Jun 2015   in Feeding chicks No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Pin-striped Tit-babbler: 2. Food for the chicks “When I posted the Pin-striped Tit-babbler (Macronous gularis) nest HERE, some responded by saying ‘could not see the nest’. Yes I agree, this is one of the best camouflaged nest I have seen. I have posted an updated image of the nest (bottom – nest in center of image) as heavy rain has pushed the reeds and structure down; nest still intact. “I have gone back twice to try and obtain information on prey for chicks, as there is limited information on prey taken... Read More

Pin-striped Tit-babbler: 1. Nesting

28 Jun 2015   in Nesting No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Pin-striped Tit-babbler: 1. Nesting “Was watching two adult Pin-striped Tit-babblers (Macronous gularis) and found it a bit odd that there were only two of them. Usually they are in a small social group. They were very accommodating and I was only a few meters away. Then, to my surprise, one of them made its way towards me, using the undergrowth, and then ‘disappeared’ into a clump of old grass and leaves just 2-3 meters from me. “The other adult tried to distract me at the same moment by flying... Read More

PINK-NECKED GREEN-PIGEONS FEEDING ON FIGS

27 Jun 2015   in Feeding-plants, Pigeon-Dove, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by Dr Leong Tzi Ming
PINK-NECKED GREEN-PIGEONS FEEDING ON FIGS “On the 9th November 2014, I was drawn towards the majestic crown of a mature fig tree (Ficus benjamina), which was punctuated with abundant red fruits. These enticing red dots had also captured the attention of Pink-necked Green-pigeons (Treron vernans). “The demographics of this flock of pigeons included: females (above), which blended with the foliage remarkably; “males (above, below), which paraded their pretty pink necks proudly; “as well as juveniles... Read More

Javan Myna taking food meant for goldfish

26 Jun 2015   in Feeding strategy No Comments »
Contributed by Dr Jean Ho
Dr Jean Ho’s video clip shows three Javan Mynas (Acridotheres javanicus) scrambling over food meant for the goldfish in the fish pond. This is typical Javan Myna behavior. It will take advantage of any food that becomes available under whatever conditions. It will take leftovers from open air cafes, hawker centres and even rubbish dumps and trucks. It follows wild boars and cattle to pick on insects displaced by these animals LINK. In urban areas it follows grass cutters... Read More

Brahminy Kite mobbed by Mynas

25 Jun 2015   in Interspecific No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS & Hans Peeters
Brahminy Kite mobbed by Mynas “I was surprised to see another raptor chased by Mynas – this time a juvenile Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus). It already had prey but was pursued by six Mynas until it left their location. I managed to catch up later with it for some images (above, below). “Hans Peeters was kind enough to pen a comment after the last post: ‘The term ‘social interaction’ is used intraspecifically in animal (and human) behavior. The word for your situation is ‘mobbing’,... Read More

Sighting of Pin-tailed Whydah Juveniles

24 Jun 2015   in Courtship-Mating, Nesting 3 Comments »
Contributed by Kwong Wai Chong
Sighting of Pin-tailed Whydah Juveniles “The courtship of the Pin-tailed Whydah (Vidua macroura) was first documented here in May 2013 LINK. “Two years later, in April/May 2015, many birders and photographers had congregated at the same location of Pulau Punggol Barat. This was after news spread that Pin-tailed Whydahs had been spotted and indulging in courtship displays (above). “The handsome male in breeding plumage with his very long black tail is already a sight to behold (above).... Read More

Brown-throated Sunbird – female collecting caterpillars for young

23 Jun 2015   in Feeding chicks, Sunbirds No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Brown-throated Sunbird – female collecting caterpillars for young “These images and observations are from our ‘magic’ kitchen window which allow good, close observations as the tinted glass and our wild garden combination brings many birds. When my wife calls me to the window, I have to grab my camera and rush over. “This time it was to see the ‘odd’ behaviour of an adult female Brown-throated Sunbird (Anthreptes malacensis malacensis). This sunbird is well known for feeding on nectar with some records of frugivory (I have... Read More