• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

© Malayan Whistling Thrush Courts Death (Part 2)

19 Apr 2014   in Illegal-Irresponsible, Species No Comments »
Contributed by Daisy O’Neill
© Malayan Whistling Thrush Courts Death (Part 2) Part 1 can be found HERE. “Texts suggest Malayan Whistling Thrush (Myophonus robinsoni) to be an extremely shy bird, occasionally seen to forage along mountain roadside dawn/dusk near to streams in broadleaved evergreen forests. “Stardust was anything but shy. The Whistling Thrush appeared periodically during day time to investigate presence of humans in the vicinity of its entrance flight path, along roadside. “My first proper sighting of this bi-annual... Read More

Blue-crowned Hanging-parrot at the nesting hole

18 Apr 2014   in Nesting, Parrots No Comments »
Contributed by Lim Sheau Torng
Blue-crowned Hanging-parrot at the nesting hole “I occasionally like to sit at the riverbank along Boat Quay during lunchtime. In early part of March this year, while sitting under a tree I heard the familiar call of a Blue-crowned Hanging-parrot (Loriculus galgulus) on top of the tree. I was trying to locate it before hearing another call coming from my right. Turning my head to the source, I immediately saw a female parrot perching at the lip of a tree cavity less than 2 metres away, answering the call from the tree... Read More

DUSKY BROADBILL PREENING

17 Apr 2014   in Feathers-maintenance, Morphology-Develop. No Comments »
Contributed by Dr. Leong Tzi Ming & Dr. Vilma D’Rozario
DUSKY BROADBILL PREENING “The Dusky Broadbill (Corydon sumatranus) has previously been described as having an ‘ungainly appearance’ (Lekagul & Round, 1991: 220 – bird no. 428). Such an impression would most certainly have stemmed from the bird’s seemingly oversized beak. Indeed, this bird truly looks comical yet adorable, especially when admired face to face (above). “On the sunny afternoon of 22nd March 2014, we had the opportunity to observe a pair at Fraser’s Hill,... Read More

Gold-whiskered Barbet nesting

16 Apr 2014   in Barbet-To'can-H'guide, Feeding chicks, Nesting, Waste No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Gold-whiskered Barbet nesting “Gold-whiskered Barbet (Megalaima chrysopogon laeta) nesting. The nest was located at the fringe of primary forest in a Durian Tree (Durio zibethinus) (above). It was excavated 7-8 meters in the dead branch of the tree. Further up were two more freshly excavated holes. Wells (Wells, D.R., 1999. The birds of the Thai-Malay Peninsular. Vol. I, Non-passerines. Academic Press, London. 648 pp.) suggests that ‘extra holes are dug in the same of neighbouring trees, apparently... Read More

Hornbills in Changi feeding nestlings – March 2014

15 Apr 2014   in Hornbills, Nesting, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by Angie Ng & Hiro Machida
Hornbills in Changi feeding nestlings - March 2014 “The Changi heritage tree Shorea gibbosa has another new family of Oriental Pied Hornbill (Anthracoceros albirostris) – see also these links LINK 1, LINK 2 and LINK 3. “It was exciting hearing the babies squealing away for their feeds. “We saw the father return with many unidentified objects as well as what looked like small white eggs and oil palm seeds. The oil palm seeds however were sometimes not readily accepted – were they too big for the babies I... Read More

Head Plumes of the Javan Pond-heron

14 Apr 2014   in Heron-Egret-Bittern, Morphology-Develop. No Comments »
Contributed by Kwong Wai Chong
Head Plumes of the Javan Pond-heron “This season, at least two Javan Pond-herons (Ardeola speciosa) were spotted at the usual place at Lorong Halus. The Javan Pond-heron can only be positively identified when it assume its breeding plumage (below). Noted that these birds were assuming breeding plumage at different times with one seen assuming breeding plumage as early as end January. “At beginning of March, one of the birds had developed short white-coloured head plumes. These head plumes were not seen... Read More

Flocks of Oriental Pratincole

13 Apr 2014   in Miscellaneous No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Flocks of Oriental Pratincole Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS encountered a flock of Oriental Pratincole (Glareola maldivarum) at his last visit to the Malim Nawar Wetlands in Perak, Malaysia on an earlier visit from quite a distance. Initially he mistook the birds for terns. The habitat consists of extensive ex-tin mining areas made up of many pond and lakes, wetlands and fish farming areas. “Today (1st September 2013) he saw them closer and the flock size has grown,” noted Amar. “I saw flocks a... Read More

Common Flameback ‘anting’ – but using tree sap

12 Apr 2014   in Exotics, Travel-Personality, uncategorised 3 Comments »
Contributed by Lena Chow, YC Wee & KC Tsang
Common Flameback ‘anting’ - but using tree sap Anting is the phenomenon where birds make use of ants to rid their feathers of ectoparasites LINK. The ants release formic acid when aggravated, in this case when they are picked up and placed among the feathers of the bird. But birds have also been known to make use of other invertebrates as well as certain plants for the same purpose. We have posted a number of accounts with photographs of anting with ants as seen HERE. However Lena Chow has now provided video evidence of... Read More

LARGE-TAILED NIGHTJAR CALLING

11 Apr 2014   in Videography, Vocalisation No Comments »
Contributed by Dr. Leong Tzi Ming
LARGE-TAILED NIGHTJAR CALLING “On the evening of 9th March 2014, I was exploring a wooded area in Singapore to observe the awakening of Large-tailed Nightjars (Caprimulgus macrurus) amongst the treetops. The arrival of darkness is typically greeted with their signature ‘chionk’ notes uttered at regular intervals. One handsome and proud male was calling boldly from atop a branch, despite occasional gusts of strong winds threatening to tip its balance (above). “A video clip of the... Read More

© Malayan Whistling Thrush Courts Death (Part 1)

10 Apr 2014   in Species No Comments »
Contributed by Daisy O’Neill
© Malayan Whistling Thrush Courts Death (Part 1) “The world order of 306 Thrushes’ (Turdidae) species is divided into nine families of which, Whistling Thrush’s (Myophonus) family consists of a very small group of two species. The Malayan Whistling (Thrush Myophonus robinsoni) is one of the two. (above, side view). “In Peninsula Malaysia, there are only four resident Turdidae species (Blue Rock-Thrush Monticola solitarius, Chestnut-capped Thrush Zoothera interpres, Blue Whistling Thrush Myophonus caeruleus,... Read More