• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Pellets from Tuas: 5. Black-shouldered Kites and House Crows

18 Mar 2015   in Crows, Interspecific, Raptors No Comments »
Contributed by Chan Yoke Meng & Melinda Chan
Pellets from Tuas: 5. Black-shouldered Kites and House Crows The pair of Black-shouldered Kites (Elanus caeruleus) nesting in Tuas was regularly harassed by the pair of House Crows (Corvus splendens) nesting a little down the road. The crows were obviously after the kites’ eggs and chicks. The presence of plentiful mice around the area kept the adults close to the nest. This meant that the adults could keep close watch on the marauding crows. To date, all four chicks were alive and well. One one occasion, an adult kite was... Read More

Juvenile Asian Glossy Starlings bathing then preening…

17 Mar 2015   in Feathers-maintenance, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by YC Wee
Juvenile Asian Glossy Starlings bathing then preening... During most hot evenings numerous Asian Glossy Starlings (Aplonis panayensis) will gather in the Pink Mempat (Cratoxylum formosum) tree fronting my house. Most of them are juveniles and they arrive at around 1830 hours. They are attracted to the small water fountain in my neighbour’s house. If the water fountain is turned on, the birds will perch on top of the glass partition to wait their turns at the cool water. After the bath they fly back to the nearby Pink Mempat... Read More

Song of the Golden-bellied Gerygone

16 Mar 2015   in Vocalisation No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Song of the Golden-bellied Gerygone “The Golden-bellied Gerygone (Gerygone sulphurea sulphurea) is an intriguing bird, especially because of its call. It is a hard bird to spot as it makes a fairy like call that wafts in the wind, floating this way and that. So locating it is a challenge. The above image is an older one taken 20th September 2009 at same site. “The best description of the song is by my sifu, GC Madoc, in his delightful book ‘An Introduction to Malayan Birds’ (1947, revised... Read More

Crested Goshawk feasting on a Common Palm Civet

15 Mar 2015   in Feeding-vertebrates, Raptors 4 Comments »
Contributed by GaoJian LiuJia, Jeremiah Loei, Xu Weiting & Fung Tze Kwan
Crested Goshawk feasting on a Common Palm Civet The series of images by GaoJian LiuJia of a Crested Goshawk (Accipiter trivirgatus) and its prey was photographed at Paisr Ris Park in early March 2015 at about noon. Discussions on the identity of the prey centered around civet cat or possible squirrel. Jeremiah Loei took the initiative to contact BESG. The images were then sent to civet researchers Xu Weiting and Fung Tze Kwan from the National University of Singapore’s Department of Biological Sciences. Weiting... Read More

NATIONAL BUTTERFLY Campaign: It’s time to VOTE for our National Butterfly

14 Mar 2015   in Butterflies and Moths, Miscellaneous 2 Comments »
Contributed by Butterfly and Insect Group, Nature Society (Singapore)
NATIONAL BUTTERFLY  Campaign: It’s time to VOTE for our National Butterfly  What better time than Singapore’s 50th year to reflect on our natural heritage? Come 21 Mar 2015, Nature Society (Singapore) or NSS plans to do just that! The National Butterfly campaign will be launched to make the public more aware of the importance of butterflies to the well being of our environment and the need to protect them and their forest habitat where most butterflies live. They will also be educated on current losses and threats to butterflies of Singapore.... Read More

Oriental Pied Hornbill’s reluctant courtship feeding

13 Mar 2015   in Courtship-Mating, Hornbills No Comments »
Contributed by YC Wee
On the evening of 4th February 2015 I sighted a pair of Oriental Pied Hornbill (Anthracoceros albirostris) perching on the television antenna of my neighbour’s house. The pair remained quietly for a few minutes before flying off to land on the crown of my Ceram Palm (Rhopaloblaste ceramica). The pair landed on the back of a frond axis. The male hornbill had a morsel clamped between the tips of his mandibles that could possibly be a lizard. He waved it in front of the... Read More

© Of Garnet Pitta And Playback Recordings: Part 2

12 Mar 2015   in Conservation No Comments »
Contributed by Daisy O’Neill & Mike Edgecombe
© Of Garnet Pitta And Playback Recordings: Part 2 Part 1 of this post can be found HERE “An initial, quick walk through grounds of Park headquarters, along some forest trails on first two consecutive days, provided some fairly good ideas where prospective birds may be had. “High on my list was the resident Garnet Pitta (Pitta granatina). “While texts would suggest March-August to be their prime breeding periods, where these ground dwellers tend to be more resoundingly vocal in attracting their partners, what about the... Read More

© Of Garnet Pitta And Playback Recordings – PART 1

11 Mar 2015   in Conservation No Comments »
Contributed by Daisy O'Neill & Mike Edgecombe
© Of Garnet Pitta And Playback Recordings - PART 1 “To encounter Pittidae species in visiting primary forests of Peninsular Malaysia has to be one of any bird-photographers’ highlights (above). “A revisit to Taman Negara late 2014, after an absence of five years, justified a comparison of differences in its faunal population and ecological habitats. It was no good news for ornithology and conservation. “Relau River that flows and dissects the Park has deteriorated in water quality, resulting in complaints of... Read More

Birding in Taiwan: 17. Light-vented Bulbul

10 Mar 2015   in Species No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Birding in Taiwan: 17. Light-vented Bulbul “We saw a small flock of Light-vented (Chinese) Bulbuls (Pycnonotus sinensis) while in transit at a major city. They were foraging for caterpillars and insects in the cold morning on roadside trees in an urban environment. These were seen fairly south so unsure if they are Pycnonotus sinensis formosae. “An earlier post highlighted the Styan’s Bulbul (Pycnonotus taivanus), also known as Taiwan Bulbul LINK. The composite image below shows Styan’s Bulbul on the left... Read More

Pellets from Tuas: 4. Analysis of 14 pellets

09 Mar 2015   in Feeding chicks, Feeding-vertebrates, Pellets, Raptors 3 Comments »
Contributed by Melinda Chan, Chan Yoke Meng, YC Wee & Wang Luan Keng
Pellets from Tuas: 4. Analysis of 14 pellets Melinda Chan made extensive collections of pellets from a tree-lined avenue in Tuas in January 2015. All pellets were covered with short grey hairs, most probably those of mice. One of these was larger than the rest, from which a near-complete skeleton of a mouse was extracted LINK. This was the only pellet that had an intact skull, all others had bone fragments and numerous loose teeth but no skull. This large pellet was thought to have come from a Barn Owl (Tyto alba).... Read More