Forensic Birding 2: Bird scats

posted in: uncategorised | 1

After forensic birding was first introduced to local birders in December 2005, a workshop subsequently conducted by “sometime” field ornithologist Wang Luan Keng (above, right) exposed us to its practical side. In addition to feathers, skeleton parts, eggs, etc., we … Continued

Of termites and toads

posted in: Miscellaneous | 0

Reading Subaraj’s posting on Termite Hatch reminds me that only about a week ago I was trying to explain the same phenomenon to my three year old daughter when we were at the carpark opposite Downtown East at sunset. A … Continued

Caterpillars and birds

posted in: Feeding-invertebrates, Hornbills | 3

Caterpillars are regularly eaten by birds. However, most birds avoid the noxious ones, especially those that are brightly coloured and hairy. Cuckoos (Cuculidae) specialise on caterpillars as these are their favourite food and they have no hesitation eating even the … Continued

Forensic Birding 1. Introduction

posted in: Miscellaneous | 0

We were introduced to forensic birding by Lin Yangchen when he wrote on 30th December 2005: “Birds are usually identified by sight or sound. It may also be possible to identify them from the tracks, feathers and droppings they leave … Continued

Angie’s nesting crows 5: Final chapter

posted in: Crows, Nesting | 0

After only three days trying to incubate their eggs, the House Crows (Corvus splendens) gave up on the morning of 28th December 2005 Thereafter, it was open house for the Asian Koels (Eudynamys scolopacea)! They were increasingly daring, stealing into … Continued

Cats in Australia

posted in: Miscellaneous | 0

Cats are an absolute no-no in Australia, where essentially they are non-native and imported by thoughtless white settlers in the 18th and 19th centuries, who even more thoughtlessly let them go ‘feral’ in the wild (believe me, these seeming pussy-cats … Continued

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