• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Rusty-rumped Warbler – call

22 Nov 2014   in Morphology-Develop., Vocalisation No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Rusty-rumped Warbler - call “Went out looking for migratory Reed Warblers this morning; heard 3 but only saw one. I was surprised that it was the Locustella Warbler (Locustella certhiola) the hardest for me to spot. It is said to be more active in the evening but, in the past and at this visit, it can be spotted in the undergrowth in the mornings preening or foraging (above). “The above nicely shows the horn black or ivory upper mandible. “There a number of calls but the one I managed to record... Read More

Bats in my porch: 22. Mating again

21 Nov 2014   in Fauna, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by YC Wee
Bats in my porch: 22. Mating again On 4th October 2014, there was, as always, a dominant male Common Fruit Bat (Cynopterus brachyotis) hanging in the porch (above). As usual, he was the first to be there, well before 19:00 hours. His presence attracted a few females and juveniles. The colony of about eight bats will only by there when both the spotlights are switched on. During this period, the bats would hang from the wooden strips. A few would fly out to return later. Other bats would fly in, some trying... Read More

Reticulated or Singapore Swamp Crab

20 Nov 2014   in Fauna, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by Lena Chow
Reticulated or Singapore Swamp Crab “One of three critically endangered crabs that are uniquely Singaporean, the Reticulated or Singapore Swamp Crab (Parathelphusa reticulata), is so named for the beautiful reticulate or mesh-like patterning on its carapace (below). “Discovered and named by Prof Peter Ng of the National University of Singapore in 1990, a gripping account of its discovery is found here LINK and reproduced as follows : “Ng’s ‘all time favourite’ discovery came in 1990. In 1988... Read More

Curlew Sandpiper – feeding behaviour

19 Nov 2014   in Feeding strategy, Feeding-invertebrates, Videography, Waders 2 Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Curlew Sandpiper - feeding behaviour “Eight to ten Curlew Sandpiper (Calidris ferrugine) present at this site, solitary or in pairs mixing with other waders. “Actively feeding as can be seen in the video below. “The feeding as been described as ‘probing in an incessant “stitching” motion’ LINK. “The above is a composite of posture changes. “Waders are a hard group for me to ID but fortunately Curlew Sandpipers are one of the easier ones.” Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS Ipoh,... Read More

Moulting of a grasshopper

18 Nov 2014   in Fauna 2 Comments »
Contributed by Amy Tsang & Dr Leong Tzi Ming
Moulting of a grasshopper Amy Tsang came across a grasshopper that she managed to photograph while accompanying KC to Pasir Ris Park on a spider mission. Wrote Amy: “I was very thrilled when I realised I had spotted a grasshopper which was newly moulted. I had not seen one before in this state. The new wings were light yellow in colour and looked soft and fresh. It looked like a ‘skirt’ when viewed at certain angles (above, below). “The grasshopper was pretty still when it first... Read More

Asian Glossy Starlings gathering on the ground

17 Nov 2014   in Miscellaneous No Comments »
Contributed by Subaraj Rajathurai & YC Wee
Asian Glossy Starlings gathering on the ground On some evening when the Asian Glossy Starling (Aplonis panayensis) were gathering in trees and palms around my area LINK prior to moving on to their main roosting trees, 40-50 mainly juveniles were seen gathering on the ground of my neighbour’s garden (above). According to Subaraj Rajathurai, “Though Asian Glossy Starlings come more readily to the ground to feed on human food, it is unusual for a large flock to gather on the ground. At this time of the year these... Read More

Mixed foraging party at Cameron Highlands, Malaysia

16 Nov 2014   in Feeding strategy No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Mixed foraging party at Cameron Highlands, Malaysia On 1st Ocrober 2014, Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS encountered a mixed species foraging party at 1,600m ASL Cameron Highlands, Pahang, Malaysia. The habitat, a clearing adjacent to primary forest Species participating in the mixed foraging party: 1. A pair of Bar-winged Flycatcher-shrikes (Hemipus picatus intermedius) (above, with prey). 2. A few Mountain Fulvettas (Alcippe peracensis) were seen feeding on fruit (above). 3. A few Yellow-rumped Flycatchers (Ficedula... Read More

©Meet Six Bulbul Species Foraging Berries – Callicarpa glabrifolis

15 Nov 2014   in Feeding-plants 1 Comment »
Contributed by Daisy O’Neill & Januarie Kulis
©Meet Six Bulbul Species Foraging Berries - Callicarpa glabrifolis “A revisit to Lambir Hills (Approx.465m a.s.l.), Sarawak in August, 2014 with a seasonal difference did not disappoint me. “The highlight of the birding trip turned out to be – a three metre tall bush, roundish in contour with green, luscious heart-shaped foliages. The mature bush planted in vicinity of Park Headquarters’ compound was crowned with a profusion of clustered berries in three stages of coloured maturity- green, white and black. “Here dripping in... Read More

Bats in my porch: 21. Hanging CDs

14 Nov 2014   in Fauna, Videography 9 Comments »
Contributed by YC Wee
Bats in my porch: 21. Hanging CDs A colony of Common Fruit Bats (Cynopterus brachyotis) had been roosting in my porch since 2006 LINK. In 2014 I got tired of the mess the bats left behind and decided to find ways to get rid of the colony. First I installed a pair of powerful spotlights LINK. This was followed by placing Compact Discs on the floor to reflect light onto the bats above. This worked initially but not for long LINK 1 and LINK 2. Along the way I found that turning on the spotlights in the late... Read More

Little Spiderhunter – nectar feeding and sexing

13 Nov 2014   in Feeding-plants, Morphology-Develop. No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Little Spiderhunter  – nectar feeding and sexing “Had an opportunity to watch an adult Little Spiderhunter (Arachnothera longirostra cinereicollis) at close range for an extended period with lots of images. “This spiderhunter feeds on the flower nectar of Papaya (Carica papaya) (top) and Banana (Musa sp.) (above). “Posting this image (above, below) as it show the underside of wing and pectoral region. There are varying opinions about sexing in this species summarised below” 1. Wells (2007) The birds of the... Read More