• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Brown Anole, a new exotic lizard for Singapore

22 Jun 2014   in Fauna, Videography 2 Comments »
Contributed by Lena Chow
Brown Anole, a new exotic lizard for Singapore “The Brown Anole is a small brown lizard from the Carribean (Anolis sagrei) recently introduced to Singapore, most likely by being unintentionally brought in with plants for Gardens by the Bay (above). “The male has a bright orange dewlap, a flap of skin below the throat, which it displays to attract females as well as when warding off predators, as a protracted dewlap makes the lizard look bigger (above). The dewlap display is also sometimes accompanied by... Read More

Little Grebe – whinny trill calls, courtship?

21 Jun 2014   in Courtship-Mating, Vocalisation No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Little Grebe – whinny trill calls, courtship? “Little Grebes (Tachybaptus ruficollis) have colonised the peninsular since the 1950s and locally retain their ‘breeding’ plumage right through the year (above). There are large numbers at Malim Nawar Wetlands. “I had an opportunity to watch what appeared to be courtship behaviour. Three adults, in good plumage, were ‘horsing around’; most appropriate term I can think of. They were frolicking in the water, with one occasionally ‘taking off’ in flight just... Read More

RED-BEARDED BEE-EATER JUVENILES

20 Jun 2014   in Bee-eaters, Fledgling-Fledging No Comments »
Contributed by Dr. Leong Tzi Ming, Dr. Vilma D’Rozario & Andrew Tay
RED-BEARDED BEE-EATER JUVENILES “On the afternoon of 11th May 2014, we were enjoying the flora and fauna at Fraser’s Hill, Peninsular Malaysia, when the nearby calls of Red-bearded Bee-eaters (Nyctyornis amictus) beckoned. As we scanned the sea of greenery, we first spotted a juvenile perched on an exposed branch (above). “It was mostly a deep, leaf green, with a hint of pale blue at the base of its bill. Just as we wondered where its parents would be, one of them arrived onto the scene and... Read More

Javan Myna foraging around human activity

19 Jun 2014   in Feeding strategy No Comments »
Contributed by YC Wee
Javan Myna foraging around human activity For months on end workers had been widening the drains along the road in my housing estate – an exercise to ensure no puddling occurs after a heavy rain. A few weeks ago was the final phase after the widened drains were covered with concrete slabs that became a pleasant walkway. Between this walkway and the road proper is a strip of exposed earth where the roadside trees grow. Workers were covering the bare earth between trees with slabs of turf. There were piles of... Read More

Gold-whiskered Barbet nesting (Part 2)

18 Jun 2014   in Barbet-To'can-H'guide, Nesting No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Gold-whiskered Barbet nesting (Part 2) An earlier post documented the nesting of the Gold-whiskered Barbet (Megalaima chrysopogon laeta) nesting in a cavity found in the dead branch of a Durian Tree (Durio zibethinus) LINK. Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS has now made two more brief visits to the nest (11th and 13th April 2014), using the same observation locations. “The birds are fully aware of my presence and will stop right above me, to check safety, before proceeding to the nest,” wrote Amar. Some images of... Read More

Black Bittern’s neck fully stretched

17 Jun 2014   in Heron-Egret-Bittern, Morphology-Develop. No Comments »
Contributed by Lena Chow
Black Bittern's neck fully stretched “Further to the video of the Von Schrenck’s Bittern (Ixobrychus eurhythmus) LINK displaying the extension of the ‘telescopic’ neck, I had the opportunity to witness the full extension of the neck of the Black Bittern (Ixobrychus flavicollis) at Pulau Ubin (below). “In my previous encounter with the Black Bittern, it showed other interesting behaviour, but kept the neck extension at bay while searching for quarry LINK. Lena Chow Singapore 3rd May... Read More

HALF-BAKED BIRDS AND OTHER ANIMALS

16 Jun 2014   in Fauna, Feathers-maintenance 2 Comments »
Contributed by Lee Chiu San
HALF-BAKED BIRDS AND OTHER ANIMALS “Many birds sun themselves. The most enthusiastic of sunbathers appear to be various species of doves, especially Zebra Doves (Geopelia striata) and Spotted Doves (Streptopelia chinensis). Both are frequent visitors to my garden, but Spotted Dove, being much larger, and somewhat aggressive (whoever said that doves were peaceful?) hog all the prime sunbathing spots. “Like mad dogs and Englishmen, they bake on my pathway in the noonday sun. Believe you me, the... Read More

Migrating Black-browed Reed-warbler in Perak, Malaysia

15 Jun 2014   in Migration-Migrants, Vocalisation No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Migrating Black-browed Reed-warbler in Perak, Malaysia “This post is a culmination of 6 visits to the same site over the past 2.5 months. I have been trying to get to know reed-warblers better and have identified a location where three different migrant species have wintered – the Pallas’s Grasshopper-warbler (Locustella certhiola), Black-browed Reed-warbler (Acrocephalus bistrigiceps) (above, below) and the Oriental Reed-warbler (Acrocephalus orientalis). “The location is a vast one with many, large ex-mining... Read More

Painted Jezebel laying eggs on a Malayan Mistletoe leaf

14 Jun 2014   in Fauna, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by Teo Lee Wei & K
Teo Lee Wei and K documented the female Painted Jezebel (Delias hyparete metarete) butterfly laying her eggs on the leaf of its host plant, the Malayan Mistletoe (Dendropthoe pentandra). The eggs are laid singly in a cluster, usually of more than 50. According to Lee Wei, “the sticky eggs are extruded with some force from her cloacal opening and travel a short space of time before sticking to the undersurface of the leaf.” Placing the eggs on the undersurface protects... Read More

NOTES ON SPIDER WASPS

13 Jun 2014   in Fauna, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by Dr Leong Tzi Ming & Jeremiah Loei
NOTES ON SPIDER WASPS “The exciting video footage by Jeremiah Loei depicts a large spider wasp (family Pompilidae) taking down an equally large huntsman spider (Heteropoda sp., family Sparassidae). After the spider prey has been stung and immobilised, the wasp then drags it away to a more secluded spot for subsequent processing. This may include amputation of all the spider’s legs, so it becomes less cumbersome and also lighter to carry. “In Sarawak (February 2011), I have watched... Read More