• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Encounter with a one-eyed Buffy Fish-owl

11 Jul 2015   in Morphology-Develop., Owls, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by Alvin Seng, Jeremiah Loei & YC Wee
Encounter with a one-eyed Buffy Fish-owl Alvin Seng’s image of the one-eyed Buffy Fish-owl (Ketupa ketupu) was photographed at Sungei Tampines in Pasir Ris Park on 2nd July 2015. The above image shows the functioning right eye with a wide yellow iris rim and a small black pupil. These are absent in the damaged left eye. The iris regulates the size of the pupil and thus the amount of light entering the eye. During the day when it is bright, the pupil is thus small (above). At night when it is dark, the pupil is... Read More

EMPEROR MATING

10 Jul 2015   in Dragonflies-Damselflies, Fauna, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by Dr. Leong Tzi Ming
EMPEROR MATING “On the morning of 20th November 2014, I had noticed the arrival of a female Emperor dragonfly (Anax guttatus, family Aeshnidae) at a local pond, inspecting if the site was suitable for her offspring and if any males would pay her any attention. Prior to her arrival, I had already observed at least two males swooping over the water and demonstrating territorial behaviour. “The female must have been well aware of the males’ presence, but was probably playing a game of... Read More

Yellow-eared Spiderhunter: 2. Nesting

09 Jul 2015   in Nesting, Nests No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS & Dr David Wells
Yellow-eared Spiderhunter: 2. Nesting Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS’s earlier account on the Yellow-eared Spiderhunter (Arachnothera chrysogenys chrysogenys) nest building activities LINK attracted the attention of Dr David Wells who commented: “Most interesting, but you must eliminate the possibility of a spiderhunter poking about in some other bird’s construction looking for food or for material to take elsewhere. This structure is so unlike any Arachnothera nest that I know or have ever seen a description... Read More

Yellow-eared Spiderhunter: 1. Nest building

08 Jul 2015   in Nesting, Nests No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Yellow-eared Spiderhunter: 1. Nest building “I mentioned recently that I have been searching for spiderhunter nests for a long time. I was fortunate today to spot the nest building activity of the Yellow-eared Spiderhunters (Arachnothera chrysogenys chrysogenys). Available literatures suggest that the nest is similar to other spiderhunters, suspended underneath a large leaf. But in the region Wells 2007 states that there has been ‘no authentic description’. “Of 5 nests reported to be of this species 2... Read More

Greater Racket-tailed Drongo in Unihemispheric Slow-wave Sleep

07 Jul 2015   in Miscellaneous No Comments »
Contributed by Kwong Wai Chong
Greater Racket-tailed Drongo in Unihemispheric Slow-wave Sleep “I first learned about birds’ ability to sleep with only one eye closed when this was posted: LINK. From Wikipedia, unihemispheric slow-wave sleep (USWS) is the ability to sleep with one half of the brain while the other half remains alert. More information on this phenomenon can be found HERE. “A Greater Racket-tailed Drongo (Dicrurus paradiseus), a common resident here, was encountered recently. This drongo had lost one of its rackets (above left) and... Read More

Purple-naped Sunbird– nectar feeding behaviour

06 Jul 2015   in Feeding-plants, Sunbirds No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Purple-naped Sunbird– nectar feeding behaviour “The Purple-naped Sunbird (Hypogramma hypogrammicum nuchale) is known to feed on insects. “I have previously posted observations of frugivorous behaviour (a poorly recognised behaviour) LINK, LINK and LINK. “There are no reported observations of nectar feeding. Wells (2007) states ‘I know of no definite area record of nectarivory ….’ “I was able to document a male Purple-naped Sunbird feeding on the nectar of the same tiny flowers [encountered earlier]. A... Read More

Sultan dragonfly oviposting

05 Jul 2015   in Dragonflies-Damselflies, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by Dr Leong Tzi Ming
Sultan dragonfly oviposting “In Singapore, the Sultan dragonfly (Camacinia gigantea) is by far the largest of the libellulids (family Libellulidae), but is not regularly nor reliably seen. Whenever an opportunity arises, it would often be the attractive males that are more noticeable (above). “The females, though less brightly coloured, are just as impressive with their formidable wingspan (above). “With the females typically outnumbered by the males, competition for them is stiff. After the... Read More

Plant-Bird Relationship: 4. References

04 Jul 2015   in Plants, References, Reports No Comments »
Contributed by YC Wee
This list is provided to allow the data in the lists of plants LINK and birds LINK to be traced to the original source/s should there be a necessity to do so. Personal communications are listed as “pers. comm.” [feeding on nectar, from left (bird-plant): Crimson Sunbird-Etlingera elatior, Javan Myna-Schefflera actinophylla, Yellow-naped Oriole-Schefflera actinophylla] List of References Amar-Singh, H. S. S., 2009a. Greater green leafbird and others feeding on... Read More

Plant-Bird Relationship: 3. List of Birds

03 Jul 2015   in Plants, References, Reports 1 Comment »
Contributed by YC Wee
This list is compiled from the plant list LINK. Under each species of birds are the different plants that they visit for shelter (roost), food (nectar, fruit or insect), nesting materials and nest sites. The birds are listed under their different families and arranged in alphabetical order. Emphasis is given to their common names, followed by their scientific names. Plants are in scientific names. Should there be a necessity to refer to the original source/s, note the plant... Read More

Plant-Bird Relationship: 2. List of plants (version 2.0)

02 Jul 2015   in Plants, References, Reports 6 Comments »
Contributed by YC Wee
The 349 species of plants are listed under algae, mosses, lichens, ferns, non-seed and seed plants. Non-seed plants (Gymnosperms) and seed plants (Angiosperms) are further listed under their different families arranged in alphabetical order. Under each plant species are the different species of birds that had been documented visiting it for shelter, food (nectar, fruit or insect), nesting materials and nest sites. References are provided to allow for tracing to their... Read More