• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Brahminy Kite feeding on fish

10 Jun 2015   in Feeding-vertebrates, Raptors, Videography 3 Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Brahminy Kite feeding on fish “An adult Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus) feeding on a fish from the nearby fish farms. “The bird was intermittently disturbed by another Brahminy Kite (not in image or video), so looked up periodically. “One of my friends says the fish is a Tinfoil Barb (Barbonymus schwanenfeldii). Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS Ipoh, Perak, Malaysia 5th April 2015 Location: Tambun Interior, Ipoh, Perak, Malaysia Habitat: Secondary growth near limestone hills, vegetable and fish... Read More

Adult Crimson-rumped Waxbill feeding fledglings

09 Jun 2015   in Exotics, Nesting 1 Comment »
Contributed by Chan Yoke Meng & Melinda Chan
Adult Crimson-rumped Waxbill feeding fledglings Melinda and Chan Yoke Meng stumbled upon an adult Crimson-rumped Waxbill (Estrilda rhodopyga) feeding two fledglings sometime in 2014 (above). The juveniles, as with most juveniles, were not afraid of Melinda and Yoke Meng, allowing them to approach within a metre. These exotic waxbills were first reported in Punggol grassland in February 2011 LINK. Originating from East Africa, this common aviary species are obviously escapees. A few months later, Lena Chow reported... Read More

Asian Golden Weaver Feeding Juvenile

08 Jun 2015   in Fledgling-Fledging 8 Comments »
Contributed by Kwong Wai Chong
Asian Golden Weaver Feeding Juvenile “We have previously documented the globally near-threatened Asian Golden Weaver (Ploceus hypoxanthus) building nests and in courtship at Tampines Eco Green LINK. Although no juveniles were seen that time, a female fetching food back to her nest and leaving with faecal sac in her beak was obvious proof of live chicks in the nest. However, nobody seems to have seen juveniles outside of the nests. “In full breeding plumage, the Asian Golden Weaver male is unmistakable in... Read More

Little Cormorant – nesting material

07 Jun 2015   in Nesting, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Little Cormorant - nesting material “The Little Cormorant (Phalacrocorax niger) has been a rare migrant locally until my sighting in August 2013 of 10-12 migratory birds in one extended wetlands location. Prior to this there have been occasional individual birds seen infrequently (above). “Since August 2013 this flock, possibly up to 15 birds, has been sighted repeatedly along a 10-12 km extensive stretch of wetlands (ex-tin mining area with extensive pond/lakes, fish and duck farming). I have presumed... Read More

Pellets from Tuas: 10. Black-shouldered Kite’s prey and bone fragments in the pellets

06 Jun 2015   in Feeding-vertebrates, Pellets, Raptors No Comments »
Contributed by Melinda Chan, Chan Yoke Meng & YC Wee
Pellets from Tuas: 10. Black-shouldered Kite’s prey and bone fragments in the pellets On 12th February 2015, Melinda Chan collected two pellets from Tuas, around the area where the pair of Black-shouldered Kites (Elanus caeruleus) was nesting LINK. One pellet was larger than the other: 55x30x25mm (above) as compared to 21x20x15mm (below). The larger was oval and very tightly packed in hairs. The smaller was disk-shaped, 21x20x15mm, also covered with hairs bur not as tightly packed. The larger pellet was somewhat smaller than an earlier one that contained a... Read More

Dawn Chorus in an urban garden

05 Jun 2015   in Videography, Vocalisation 4 Comments »
Contributed by YC Wee
Dawn Chorus in an urban garden During the night diurnal birds roost in trees, remaining silent throughout. Just before dawn they wake up and start vocalising. This mass singing of birds is referred to as the dawn chorus. It has been noted that the quantity and often also the quality of singing during this period is significantly different from the singing during the day. With some species the songs are also different during the day. And not all species join in the chorus at the same time. In my urban... Read More

White-tailed Robin – nesting

04 Jun 2015   in Nesting No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS & Hans Peeters
White-tailed Robin – nesting “I was exploring a new trail today at this hill station and came across a female White-tailed Robin (Myiomela leucura leucura) with prey for the young (above). The image below shows a male with prey. “I kept my distance and watched as both parents brought animal prey, predominantly worms (no insects or fruit seen). “I managed to gradually identify the nesting location (above). It was a dark, full canopy location with light coming in only where a small stream... Read More

Yellow-vented Bulbul chasing a Plantain Squirrel

03 Jun 2015   in Fauna, Interspecific No Comments »
Contributed by YC Wee
I witnessed a Plantain Squirrel, also known as Common Red-bellied Squirrel (Callosciurus notatus singapurensis) scrambling through a grove of palms, followed by the sound of a bird flying through the vegetation. Then I saw a Yellow-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus goiavier) chasing the squirrel until the latter left the scene altogether. I suspect that there must be a nesting pair of Yellow-vented Bulbuls around, otherwise it would not be that aggressive.... Read More

Black-throated Sunbird – female eating flowers

02 Jun 2015   in Feeding-plants, Nesting, Sunbirds No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Black-throated Sunbird – female eating flowers “A female Black-throated Sunbird (Aethopyga saturate waryi) collecting nesting material from cut grass and bushes (above, below). “A female was also seen eating flowers of the Poikilospermum suaveolens (Family: Urticaceae) to get the nectar. “See also HERE and HERE.” Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS Ipoh, Perak, Malaysia Location: 1,600m ASL, Cameron Highlands, Malaysia Habitat: A public road along primary montane forest Date: 11th and 22nd April... Read More

COMMON FLANGETAIL FEMALE FEEDING

01 Jun 2015   in Dragonflies-Damselflies, Fauna, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by Dr. Leong Tzi Ming
COMMON FLANGETAIL FEMALE FEEDING “The Common Flangetail (Ictinogomphus decoratus, family Gomphidae) is the most readily observed member of the Clubtail family in Singapore and are regularly sighted along reservoirs, ponds and streams. However, it is usually the males that are encountered as they bask boldly in the sun and guard their turf (above, below). “The female is rarely seen, but I was provided with brief views of one fine example on 19th November 2014 (below). She is very similar to the... Read More