• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Oriental Magpie Robin: Distraction tactic

02 Aug 2007   in Feeding chicks 4 Comments »
Contributed by Johnny Wee
Oriental Magpie Robin: Distraction tactic Many birds will try to distract you if you are near their nest, especially when there are chicks around. I have personally experience a Yellow-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus goiavier) as well as a Large-tailed Nightjar (Caprimulgus macrurus) trying to get me away from their nests by trying the “broken wing” trick. The Oriental Magpie Robin (Copsychus saularis) does something else. Last week, Johnny Wee came across a male Oriental Magpie Robin accompanied by a pair of... Read More

Circus of the Spineless #23

01 Aug 2007   in uncategorised No Comments »
Contributed by - see article -
BESG is participating in Circus of the Spineless #23, a monthly celebration of insects, arachnids, molluscs, crustaceans, worms and most anything else that wiggles. If you are into invertebrates, this is the site for you. There are numerous sites where you can link up with from all over the world on these creatures. On birds, “the Bird Ecology Study Group tells about Birds and centipedes. Birdchick writes about apiculture in Son of a Beeswax! Corey of 10,000 Birds... Read More

Nesting of Grey-rumped Treeswift

30 Jul 2007   in Nesting, Nesting-failed, Swifts-Swallows No Comments »
Contributed by - see article -
Nesting of Grey-rumped Treeswift In May 2007 Melinda and Meng came across a pair of nesting Grey-rumped Treeswift (Hemiprocne longipennis) in a patch of secondary growth in the north of the island. They built their nest attached to a slender branch of an acacia tree (Acacia auriculariformis) some 20 metres high. The sexes are easily distinguished, with the male having rufous ear-coverts (left top) and the female blackish ear-coverts (left bottom). The nest is a half-saucer made from hardened saliva... Read More

Banded Woodpecker – umbrella tree

29 Jul 2007   in Feeding chicks, Plants No Comments »
Contributed by YC
Banded Woodpecker - umbrella tree It was a quiet morning of the 3rd July 2007 when I suddenly heard the soft cries of a fledgling begging for food: ‘kwok-kwok-kwok’. The cries did not sound familiar so I went outside to have a look. Sure enough, there perching in the umbrella tree (Schefflera actinophylla) was an adult Banded Woodpecker (Picus miniaceus), also known as Banded Yellownape (above left). It was flying from one point of the tree to another, actively gleaning ants from among the... Read More

Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve: Of birds and crocs

27 Jul 2007   in uncategorised No Comments »
Contributed by - see article -
Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve: Of birds and crocs The Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve is famed for its migratory birds. But there are more than migratory birds. There are a number of uncommon resident species that can be seen, like the Stork-billed Kingfisher (Halcyon capensis) (below: top left). Common residents species include Brown-throated Sunbird (Anthreptes malacensis) (below: bottom left), Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea) (below: bottom right) and Ashy Tailorbird (Orthotomus ruficeps) (below: top right). Once in a while, you... Read More

Nesting of Collared Kingfisher

25 Jul 2007   in Feeding chicks, Kingfishers, Nesting No Comments »
Contributed by Eddy Lee
Nesting of Collared Kingfisher On 6th April 2007 Eddy Lee chanced upon a nest of the Collared Kingfisher (Todiramphus chloris): “The nest was located about 3 m above the ground in a dead tree trunk (above). The chicks were still young for I did not notice their beaks protruding from the nest hole when the parents returned with food. Both parents took turns to feed them at an interval of about 10-15 minutes. A variety of food was included in the chicks diet, consisting of forest cockroach, beetle,... Read More

Observations on nesting of Peregrine Falcon in Perak, Malaysia

23 Jul 2007   in Nesting, Raptors 3 Comments »
Contributed by Chiu Sein Chiong, Ooi Beng Yean & Connie Khoo Siew Yoong
Observations on nesting of Peregrine Falcon in Perak, Malaysia Introduction: The location of the eyrie was at one of the two sites close to Ipoh, discovered on 29 May 2005 by Chiu Sein Chiong, Laurent Molard and Dr. Chan Kai Soon where juvenile peregrines were observed flying (Suara Enggang Vol.14, No.3, 2006 Pg.11-15) Observations from 22 January to 11 June 2006 were carried out weekly from the time of courtship displays to incubation and the frequency of our observations increased to 3-4 times a week during the brooding to... Read More

Changeable Hawk Eagle: Nesting observations

21 Jul 2007   in Nesting, Raptors No Comments »
Contributed by Mark Chua
Changeable Hawk Eagle: Nesting observations Changeable Hawk Eagle (Spizaetus cirrhatus) is a rather uncommon resident in Singapore, with a few pairs remaining. On 12th May 2006, Mark Chua first sighted the nest of a pair of Changeable Hawk Eagles (pale morph) while out photographing birds in the western part of the island (above). It was made up of large twigs piled high between the fork of a tall tree. Both adults assisted in the building, bringing pieces of the twigs one at a time. It has been reported that the... Read More

Wildlife garden in a high-rise apartment

19 Jul 2007   in Conservation, Sunbirds 6 Comments »
Contributed by Teresa Teo Guttensohn
Wildlife garden in a high-rise apartment “This week the Guttensohn’shome at Bukit Batok St 25 received a surprise guest (above). It’s just the kind of “squatter” we’ve been dreaming of. An Olive-backed Sunbird (Cinnyris jugularis) had chosen my “highrise garden” to build a home. My daughter Tia first noticed the completed nest and I confess I missed it whilst rushing to work in the mornings and returning home late. “I did observe some strands of dried leaf material dangling from the... Read More

What caused two nesting failures on the same plant?

17 Jul 2007   in Nesting-failed, Sunbirds 4 Comments »
Contributed by Lam Chun See
What caused two nesting failures on the same plant? Lam Chun See lives in a house popular with nesting birds. In late June 2007 a pair of Yellow-vented Bulbuls (Pycnonotus goiavier) visited his place and decided to set up home in his balcony. After a few days of hard work, before their home was even completed, the pair mysteriously left, leaving a mess of leaves, twigs, moss and other stuff on his balcony floor. As he wrote in his blog, “I don’t know what caused them to abandon their project. I don’t think it was lack... Read More