• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Oriental Pied Hornbill sighted at Mt Emily 100908

10 Sep 2008   in Hornbills No Comments »
Contributed by Matt Tay & R Subaraj
30th August 2008, Matt Tay wrote: “This morning, at around 9:15am, i saw a hornbill perched on a tree outside my second floor window in Sophia Road, right at the junction with Mount Sophia. I first noticed a relatively big dark bird with long tail feathers, and assumed that it was a male Koel, since they are quite a common sight around my area. However, as i looked closer i realized that it unmistakably was a hornbill, probably an Oriental Pied Hornbill (Anthracoceros... Read More

Rufous-bellied Eagle taking a Pink-necked Green Pigeon

09 Sep 2008   in Feeding-vertebrates, Raptors 2 Comments »
Contributed by KC Tsang
Rufous-bellied Eagle taking a Pink-necked Green Pigeon KC Tsang was at the Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve on 7th September 2008 when he encountered a raptor catching a Pink-necked Green Pigeon (Treron vernans). “We had a bit of drama and excitement at the carpark of SBWR, 12.50pm, as I was packing my equipment to leave, a raptor swooped on to a sleepy Pink-necked Green Pigeon on a branch just above us. A visitor yelled ‘The eagle has got something.’ So got my gear out of the boot, and started taking pictures.... Read More

Spotted Wood Owl spotted

07 Sep 2008   in Owls No Comments »
Contributed by Victor Lee
Spotted Wood Owl spotted On 25th August 2008, Victor Lee, who resides at at Jalan Kemuning, wrote: “Was woken early this morning around 6.30am when I heard something jumping onto one of my aviaries. Thought it was the neighbour’s cat trying to get our birds again. When out to check but before I got to the aviary, I heard the flapping of large wings but didn’t manage to see anything. “Later in the same morning, my neighbour from two houses away called me to come and see this large... Read More

Nesting of the Blue-winged Pitta

06 Sep 2008   in Nesting 2 Comments »
Contributed by Nelson Khor
Nesting of the Blue-winged Pitta The Blue-winged Pitta (Pitta moluccensis) is an extremely shy and beautiful bird that is on the “must see” list of all birders and photographers. It is a rare winter visitor and passage migrant and its appearance in the Singapore Botanic Gardens some time ago send birders and photographers extremely excited. The bird is still around most months and can be viewed if one knows where to go. In Peninsular Malaysia, it is a summer breeding visitor in the northern states of... Read More

Plain-pouched Hornbill: Injured juvenile rescued

05 Sep 2008   in Hornbills, Rescue No Comments »
Contributed by Forest Ang
Plain-pouched Hornbill: Injured juvenile rescued Forest Ang visited Ulu Muda in Kedah, Malaysia recently to survey the forest reserve as it was in the news of possible new logging activities. What he brought back were images of a juvenile Plain-pouched Hornbill (Rhyticeros subruficollis) that a villager of Kampong Belantek rescued. “We were taken to a village (just bordering Ulu Muda Forest Reserve) where a captive Plain-pouched Hornbill was kept. We were told that they found the chick (with injured wing) and brought it... Read More

Black-thighed Falconet eating grasshopper

04 Sep 2008   in Feeding-invertebrates, Raptors No Comments »
Contributed by Jimmy Tan
Black-thighed Falconet eating grasshopper Jimmy Tan a.k.a. skylark was in Temburong, Brunei one August 2008 morning when he documented a Black-thighed Falconet (Microbierax fringillarius) feasting on a grasshopper. “These little raptors are usually perched high but do come down low to feed. I saw this particular one catch what looked like a grasshopper and go to this perch to feed. It then proceeded to devour the grasshopper, head first. Then it went on to the legs before the thorax and abdomen. It finished off... Read More

Brahminy Kite eating on the wing

03 Sep 2008   in Feeding strategy, Feeding-vertebrates No Comments »
Contributed by willis
Brahminy Kite eating on the wing The Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus) is carnivorous, taking a variety of animal foods like mammals, amphibians, reptiles, birds, fish and even carrion. It forages by quartering, seizing its prey by gliding down or diving. Sometimes it even gives a short chase at ground level. Prey is often eaten on the wing. This is thought to cut down on losses to other birds, although the bird themselves are prone to kleptoparasitism – robbing other birds of their food. The images here... Read More

Brown Wood Owl taking a grasshopper

02 Sep 2008   in Feeding-invertebrates, Owls 2 Comments »
Contributed by KC Tsang
Brown Wood Owl taking a grasshopper “Just came back from a short run up Peninsula Malaysia, came across this juvenile Brown Wood Owl (Strix leptogrammica), feasting on a grasshopper. Now one would have thought that owls would eat only eat… rats, birds, and other vertebrates. So this eating of insects was a surprise for me. “Owls seemed to be doing very well up in Peninsula Malaysia. They can be found commonly hanging around rice fields from Perak down to Melacca, all looking out for rats and others.... Read More

Blue Magpie eating Red-whiskered Bulbul

01 Sep 2008   in Feeding-vertebrates No Comments »
Contributed by Jianzhong Liu
Blue Magpie eating Red-whiskered Bulbul Blue Magpie (Urocissa erythrorhyncha), also known as Red-billed Blue Magpie and Red-billed Magpie, is a lowland arboreal species of the subtropical forests. It is distinctive in its red bill and long tail. It is found over most of the far east of mainland Asia. It moves in small parties of up to a dozen birds. The diet of the Blue Magpie includes invertebrates, fruits, small frogs, snakes, lizards, rodents, nestling birds, eggs and carrion. This image of the Blue Magpie... Read More

Striped Tit Babbler: A failed nesting

31 Aug 2008   in Nesting-failed No Comments »
Contributed by Tsen Thau Ming
Striped Tit Babbler: A failed nesting Tsen Thau Ming a.k.a. t_tsen was again at the Admiralty Park in August 2008. This time he stalked a pair of nesting Striped Tit Babbler (Macronous gularis) and documented their nesting that unfortunately ended in failure. “On August 7… I spotted a Striped Tit Babbler with nesting material flying low over the ground (left). My instincts told me that it was about to start building a nest or had already started. I followed the bird with my bino and when it flew behind some... Read More