• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Albino Javan Myna accepted by others of the species

06 Mar 2008   in Morphology-Develop. 3 Comments »
Contributed by Subaraj Rajathurai
Albino Javan Myna accepted by others of the species “On January 13th, 2008, John McGeehin, Shamla Subaraj and I spotted an albino Javan Myna (Acridotheres javanicus) at the main car park of Bukit Batok Nature Park. “The time was about 5.30 pm and the bird was walking about a grass patch, searching for food. I managed to take a few photos. It was then that I noticed a “normal” Javan Myna foraging close-by. We observed the duo for a while and noticed that they were probably a pair as they kept fairly close to... Read More

Sighting of Oriental Plover

05 Mar 2008   in Migration-Migrants, Waders No Comments »
Contributed by Lin Yangchen and Subaraj Rajathurai
Sighting of Oriental Plover The Oriental Plover (Charadrius veredus) breeds from Mongolia to NE China (including a part of Russia). It migrates through Eastern China, Eastern South-East Asia, Wallacea and Micronesia to winter in Northern Australia, with a few reaching New Zealand. Its usual route bypasses Singapore. However, freak weather conditions or biological factors may cause the occasional Oriental Plover to make landfall on the east coast of Singapore. One such plover was spotted at Changi Cove... Read More

Javan Myna chick: 1. Rescue

04 Mar 2008   in Morphology-Develop., Rescue No Comments »
Contributed by YC & Lin Yangchen
Javan Myna chick: 1. Rescue On 21st February 2008, Lin Yangchen offered me a Javan Myna (Acridotheres javanicus) nestling that a colleague of his picked up near their office. This is my second nestling, the first was a Little Heron (Butorides striatus) that I looked after until it was ready for release. Apparently the nestling must have been kicked out of the nest by its sibling, a common occurrence (above). Hatched naked and blind, as with all altrical young, the eyes of this nestling when picked up... Read More

Changi hornbill inside nest hole

03 Mar 2008   in Hornbills, Nesting No Comments »
Contributed by Subaraj Rajathurai
Changi hornbill inside nest hole “The pair of Oriental Pied Hornbills (Anthracoceros albirostris) that have been in and around Changi Village for 2-3 years now, have tried unsuccessfully to nest a few times (see Related Posts, below). “Since last year, I have seen the pair at the main Red-breasted Parakeet (Psittacula alexandri) and Tanimbar Corella (Cacatua goffini) nesting area along the main road, on a few occasions. Each time, the cockatoos would be nowhere to be seen and the parakeets... Read More

Distraction tactic of Red Junglefowl

02 Mar 2008   in Nesting No Comments »
Contributed by Allan Teo
Distraction tactic of Red Junglefowl Allan Teo came across a female Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus) around Changi Village recently. The bird was obviously incubating her eggs in her nest somewhere nearby. She was desperately trying to lead him away from her nest, fluttering from branch to branch and repeatedly made calls to attract his attention. Junglefowls nest on the bare ground in the undergrowth. Chicks are hatched covered with down and some juvenal feathers. Within a few days they are capable of walking,... Read More

Glossy Swiftlets at Fraser’s Hill, Malaysia

01 Mar 2008   in Swifts-Swallows No Comments »
Contributed by KC Tsang & Amy Tsang
“We have known the location of the roosting site of the Glossy Swiftlets (Collocalia esculenta) on Fraser’s Hill for many years now. It is such a common bird there but without any exceptional colour pattern or design to attract our attention, we have left this species out of our radar scan. “However, I have recently become aware that there could be more species of swiftlets in Singapore’s airspace than a lot of us realise. So I am curious about... Read More

Coppersmith Barbet: Courtship and mating

29 Feb 2008   in Barbet-To'can-H'guide, Courtship-Mating No Comments »
Contributed by Dr Redzian Abdul Rahman
Coppersmith Barbet: Courtship and mating Dr Redzian Abdul Rahman from Raub, Malaysia, observed and documented the courtship and mating behaviour of the Coppersmith Barbet (Megalaima haemacephala) that we are presenting below. Where he lives, there is a small grove of banana and papaya plants by a river and there are “lots of birds, such as Yellow-vented Bulbul, Mynas, Glosy Starling, Black-nape Oriole, etc., a full list of which is given in his blog. . . . In the top image, the male flies in to perch near the... Read More

Pacific Reef Egret foraging along a canal

28 Feb 2008   in Feeding strategy, Heron-Egret-Bittern 4 Comments »
Contributed by Dr Leong Tzi Ming & R Subaraj
Pacific Reef Egret foraging along a canal On the afternoon of 15th February 2008, Dr Leong Tzi Ming was taking a casual stroll along the Telok Kurau Canal near his home when he spotted a heron foraging in the shallow water of the canal. Tzi Ming is familiar with Little Heron (Butorides striatus), Black-crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) and Little Egret (Egretta garzetta), but not this bird. His suspected it to be a Pacific Reef Egret (Egretta sacra). According to our bird specialist R Subaraj, “This is... Read More

Himalayan Griffon captured and displayed

27 Feb 2008   in Illegal-Irresponsible, Migration-Migrants, Raptors, Rescue 1 Comment »
Contributed by KC Tsang
Himalayan Griffon captured and displayed On 25th February 2008, KC Tsang circulated the following account: “It is sad to see this very regal-looking bird end up 
this way in someone’s cage in Bintan, Indonesia. Could it be
 for the better? I found this out from two very
 reliable sources. One was an Indian couple I met at a party, and 
the other, a person who was able to supply these pictures.

The Himalayan Vulture (Gyps himalayensis), also known as Himalayan Griffon, is now caged in a... Read More

Black-naped Orioles raiding nest of Pied Triller

26 Feb 2008   in Interspecific No Comments »
Contributed by Prof Cheong Loong Fah
Prof Cheong Loong Fah chanced upon our post on Nest Raiding in the Singapore Botanic Gardens and shares his experience about Black-naped Orioles (Oriolus chinensis) (left top) raiding the nest of the Pied Triller (Lalage nigra) (left bottom): “I once had a pair of Pied Trillers nesting in front of my house. One day, a Black-naped Oriole spotted the nest and tried to raid it. The oriole was chased off by one of the Pied Trillers quite vigorously; the fight was quite fierce... Read More