• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Common Kingfisher in comfort behaviour

03 Nov 2008   in Comfort behaviour, Feathers-maintenance, Kingfishers No Comments »
Contributed by Rane Wong
Common Kingfisher in comfort behaviour The arrival of the Common Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) in Singapore around October 2008 saw many photographers documenting this common winter visitor and passage migrant. The bird arrives as early as 14th August and as later as 14th May. The images here by Rane Wong a.k.a Reno shows the bird preening its wings. Common Kingfisher often preen immediately after bathing in water. This forms an important part of its comfort behaviour. First, one wing is raised to allow the bird to... Read More

Seed dispersal by bulbuls in Hong Kong

02 Nov 2008   in Feeding-plants No Comments »
Contributed by YC
Seed dispersal by bulbuls in Hong Kong When bird-photographers and even birders make observations in the field on the fruits birds take, they could keep an eye on how the fruits are eaten – swallowed whole, pecked piece by piece, squashed the contents out, etc. And another observation that needs be to noted is how soon and how far away are the seeds excreted or even regurgitated. Prof Richard T Corlett, formerly of the University of Hong Kong, now back with the National University of Singapore, is keenly... Read More

Falcons, eagles and a kite all in one morning

01 Nov 2008   in Raptors 1 Comment »
Contributed by KC & Amy Tsang
Falcons, eagles and a kite all in one morning On 19th October 2008, KC Tsang and wife Amy was at Teruk Track near Kranji when they spotted a Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus). “Amy and me spotted a pair at Terut Track this morning at around 11.00 am,
 high up the BBC’s radio pylons, one on each pylon (above). They had reveled themselves by their load calls … kek… kek…kek… if not it would had been next to impossible to spot them…” “Besides the peregrine falcons, there was a... Read More

Stork-billed Kingfisher foraging on a rotting branch

31 Oct 2008   in Kingfishers, Miscellaneous 1 Comment »
Contributed by Jay Tan
Stork-billed Kingfisher foraging on a rotting branch On 1st October 2008, Jay Tan a.k.a. jay documented a series of images of a Stork-billed Kingfisher (Halcyon capensis) picking off pieces of rotting wood off its perch at the Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve. “Was at SBWR yesterday and saw this storky picking off tree bark from the branch it was perching on. It went on to whack the bark around and did something like munching on it… It did not swallow the entire bark though and finally dropped it. What is it actually... Read More

Oriental Pied Hornbill came for a visit

30 Oct 2008   in Hornbills 5 Comments »
Contributed by Ng Bee Choo, Morten Strange & R Subaraj
Oriental Pied Hornbill came for a visit At about 6pm on the 17th October 2008, a male (Anthracoceros albirostris) visited the apartment building at Transit Road where Morten Strange and Ng Bee Choo are residing. The large bird perched on the verandah railing and looked into the glass window of the apartment. Before Bee Choo and son Mark were able to invite it in, the hornbill flew off to land on the roof of a nearby building. According to Morten, “The exact origin of this bird is not certain. It is the male... Read More

Pigeon “KLPR 2008 233682″ landed on M. V. Harrier

29 Oct 2008   in Miscellaneous, Pigeon-Dove 2 Comments »
Contributed by Opel Mok
Pigeon "KLPR 2008 233682" landed on M. V. Harrier Opel Mok sent this message on 22nd October 2008: “We were supplying fuel to this vessel M.V. ”Harrier” when this pigeon flew onto us! There was another one still on the “Harrier”. The vessel’s last port of call was S. Korea and I think they must had mistook the eagle from that funnel to be their target and home in! “It had the tag No. KLPR 2008 233682 and from those Chinese stampings on the wings I think they were from Taiwan. It was quite weak; we fed... Read More

Babbler feeding Drongo Cuckoo fledgling

28 Oct 2008   in Brood parasitism 2 Comments »
Contributed by Adrian Lim
Babbler feeding Drongo Cuckoo fledgling It is always pleasant to see an adult bird feeding its fledgling. It is sometimes puzzling to witness an adult feeding a fledgling of a different species. But when the fledgling is larger than the adult, it is a different feeling altogether. I suppose this was what Adrina Lim a.k.a. wmw998 felt when he documented a babbler feeding a very much larger Drongo Cuckoo (Surniculus lugubris) that looks so very different. One wonders how the adult is not able to recognize that the... Read More

A handicapped Blue-winged Leafbird

27 Oct 2008   in Miscellaneous No Comments »
Contributed by Choo Teik Ju
A handicapped Blue-winged Leafbird Choo Teik Ju a.k.a choo was in China recently and brought back images of a female Blue-winged Leafbird taken from the Liuxihe National Forest Park, Conghua. The bird had an injured right foot but this did not prevent her from moving from tree to tree foraging and from perching on the branches. Other than the injured foot, the bird was healthy and just as active as a normal bird. This post is a cooperative effort between www.naturepixels.org and BESG to bring the study of... Read More

Eurasian Curlew at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

26 Oct 2008   in Waders 2 Comments »
Contributed by Jacqueline Lau, Robert Teo & Ben Lee
Eurasian Curlew at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve On 18th October 2008, photographers had a field day at the Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve when a Eurasian Curlew (Numenius arquata) was spotted among a flock of Whimbrels (Numenius phaeopus) by Robert Teo, among others. This is an uncommon non-breeding winter visitor and passage migrant that begins to arrive as early as 24th August till 22nd March. This curlew is one of the largest of the waders and has an exceptionally long and decurved bill. According to Gils & Wiersma... Read More

Malayan Water Monitor catching catfish

25 Oct 2008   in Miscellaneous 3 Comments »
Contributed by Melbao
Malayan Water Monitor catching catfish Meibao sent in this note and the image above: “I was lucky enough to see a monitor lizard with a very very fresh-looking catfish in its jaws during low tide. (At the main bridge just outside the main hide.) “Suspect it just got lucky and managed to get a catfish that got stranded when the tide receded. But it went off with the fish when it realised it had a big group of spectators, so didn’t manage to watch it feed. “The last time I came across a feeding monitor... Read More