• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Brown Wood Owl taking a grasshopper

02 Sep 2008   in Feeding-invertebrates, Owls 2 Comments »
Contributed by KC Tsang
Brown Wood Owl taking a grasshopper “Just came back from a short run up Peninsula Malaysia, came across this juvenile Brown Wood Owl (Strix leptogrammica), feasting on a grasshopper. Now one would have thought that owls would eat only eat… rats, birds, and other vertebrates. So this eating of insects was a surprise for me. “Owls seemed to be doing very well up in Peninsula Malaysia. They can be found commonly hanging around rice fields from Perak down to Melacca, all looking out for rats and others.... Read More

Blue Magpie eating Red-whiskered Bulbul

01 Sep 2008   in Feeding-vertebrates No Comments »
Contributed by Jianzhong Liu
Blue Magpie eating Red-whiskered Bulbul Blue Magpie (Urocissa erythrorhyncha), also known as Red-billed Blue Magpie and Red-billed Magpie, is a lowland arboreal species of the subtropical forests. It is distinctive in its red bill and long tail. It is found over most of the far east of mainland Asia. It moves in small parties of up to a dozen birds. The diet of the Blue Magpie includes invertebrates, fruits, small frogs, snakes, lizards, rodents, nestling birds, eggs and carrion. This image of the Blue Magpie... Read More

Striped Tit Babbler: A failed nesting

31 Aug 2008   in Nesting-failed No Comments »
Contributed by Tsen Thau Ming
Striped Tit Babbler: A failed nesting Tsen Thau Ming a.k.a. t_tsen was again at the Admiralty Park in August 2008. This time he stalked a pair of nesting Striped Tit Babbler (Macronous gularis) and documented their nesting that unfortunately ended in failure. “On August 7… I spotted a Striped Tit Babbler with nesting material flying low over the ground (left). My instincts told me that it was about to start building a nest or had already started. I followed the bird with my bino and when it flew behind some... Read More

Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

30 Aug 2008   in Conservation, Featured, Reports 5 Comments »
Contributed by YC
Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology, ecology and conservation biology) of Singapore. A PDF copy of the paper can be obtained from the website of the Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, National University of Singapore, by clicking HERE. Authored by two Nature Society’s insiders who were part of the early struggle for nature... Read More

Mountain Fulvetta eating a hopper?

29 Aug 2008   in Feeding-invertebrates No Comments »
Contributed by Adrian Lim
Mountain Fulvetta eating a hopper? Adrian Lim managed to few shots of the Mountain Fulvetta (Alcippe peracensis) having breakfast early one morning in May 2008. The insect it managed to capture appears to be a beetle. The bird behaves a little like a shrike in the way that it eats its prey, using its ‘claw’ to hold it. This shy montane forest babbler is a resident of Peninsular Malaysia. Like most babblers, they move in the lower levels of the forest and it is generally difficult to photograph... Read More

Australia’s own Don Juan: The bowerbirds

28 Aug 2008   in Courtship-Mating, Species 1 Comment »
Contributed by Daisy O'Neill
Australia's own Don Juan: The bowerbirds One great way to see Australia is to get on to the coastal ‘choo-choo” train- The Sunlander. A thirty-one hour journey from Brisbane to Cairns- gateway to one of world’s UNESCO heritage sites- the Great Barrier Reef, turned out to be quicker than I thought, in the right company of a lively 70 year old, lady retiree. I savoured my dinner of roast pork with crackling and finished off with tea at the mobile diner. I had time to reminiscent my past… my good, youth days... Read More

White-winged Tern: Hunting technique

27 Aug 2008   in Feeding strategy 1 Comment »
Contributed by Dr Jonathan Cheah Weng Kwong
White-winged Tern: Hunting technique An earlier post gives the non-breeding, breeding (above) and transitional plumages of the White-winged Tern (Chlidonias leucopterus), also known as White-winged Black Tern documented by Dr Jonathan Cheah Weng Kwong at Kranji. This is a migratory bird that moves down the Malay Peninsula to Singapore and beyond to as far as Australia to winter. This tern is a generalist feeder, taking aquatic as well as terrestrial insects, small fish and tadpoles. It has a number of feeding... Read More

Oriental Pied Hornbill in comfort behaviour

26 Aug 2008   in Comfort behaviour, Feathers-maintenance, Hornbills 3 Comments »
Contributed by YC
Oriental Pied Hornbill in comfort behaviour At around 1250 hours on the 23rd July 2008, there was a loud call in my garden that I traced to a pair of Oriental Pied Hornbill (Anthracoceros albirostris). The birds were perching on the TV aerial on the roof of my neighbour’s house. The male hornbill was calling on and off loudly with the female by his side (top left). The latter then preened the head of the former (top right) before joining in with a call of her own (below left). The male then began preening... Read More

Chestnut-bellied Malkoha catching a grasshopper

25 Aug 2008   in Feeding-invertebrates No Comments »
Contributed by Chris Lee
Chestnut-bellied Malkoha catching a grasshopper The Chestnut-bellied Malkoha (Phaenicophaeus sumatranus) is basically an insectivore. Its food includes various insects like locusts, mantids, stick insects, leaf insects, crickets, grasshoppers, cicada and large hairy caterpillars (Payne, 1997). Occasionally, it takes frogs and agamid lizards or even small fruits and seeds (Wells, 199). This image, provided by Chris Lee a.k.a. chrisli023 and photographed in August 2008, shows the malkoha with a katydid or long-horned... Read More

Black-necked Storks and the Australian Pelican

24 Aug 2008   in Interspecific 1 Comment »
Contributed by Dr CH Lee
Black-necked Storks and the Australian Pelican Dr CH Lee a.k.a. lchxian recounts his August 2008 encounter, with a pair of Black-necked Stork (Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus) confronting an Australian Pelican (Pelecanus conspicillatus) in Townsville, Australia: “…Black-necked Stork is considered an endangered species in Australia. Also commonly called Jabiru in Australia, I think Jabiru should be reserved for Jabiru (Jabiru mycteria) in Mexico. Jabiru in Tupi-Guarani languages means “swollen neck”, the... Read More