• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Sighting of the Pacific Reef Egret

19 Sep 2008   in Reports, uncategorised No Comments »
Contributed by - see article -
Sighting of the Pacific Reef Egret The Pacific Reef Egret (Egretta sacra), also known as Eastern Reef-egret, is an uncommon resident in Singapore. It has been spotted on and off in storm canals, rivers, mangroves, etc. over the past years. On 31st August the egret was again spotted foraging in a canal and photographed by Mark Chua. This egret is polymorphic, with white and dark grey morphs. The bird spotted is obviously a dark grey morph. It feeds alone or in pairs, by day or night depending on the tide.... Read More

Sighting of the Pacific Reef Egret

19 Sep 2008   in Heron-Egret-Bittern No Comments »
Contributed by - see article -
The Pacific Reef Egret (Egretta sacra), also known as Eastern Reef-egret, is an uncommon resident in Singapore. It has been spotted on and off in storm canals, rivers, mangroves, etc. over the past years. On 31st August the egret was again spotted foraging in a canal and photographed by Mark Chua. This egret is polymorphic, with white and dark grey morphs. The bird spotted is obviously a dark grey morph. It feeds alone or in pairs, by day or night depending on the tide.... Read More

Publications of the Bird Ecology Study Group

18 Sep 2008   in Reports No Comments »
Contributed by YC
Publications of the Bird Ecology Study Group This site gives an updated list of publications that have direct or indirect relevance to this weblog since its inception in 2005. Now why publish? Postings in the weblog make observations readily available to anyone with a computer. However, such postings tend to be rather informal. There is thus a need to compile relevant postings and formally publish them, as far as possible, in scientific journals. Why? These have credibility in terms of scientific content that magazines... Read More

Raptors attracted to wet waste disposal

17 Sep 2008   in Miscellaneous, Reports No Comments »
Contributed by Subaraj Rajathurai
Raptors attracted to wet waste disposal “Pulau Nikoi is a small island off the east coast of Pulau Bintan, within the Riau Archipelago, Indonesia. The island is privately leased by a group of people and a resort has been built there. Much of the island’s remnant natural areas has been preserved, where possible, and a variety of flora and fauna are to be found. “The two regular coastal raptors, the White-bellied Sea-Eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster) and the Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus) are both... Read More

Common Tailorbird’s food menu

16 Sep 2008   in Feeding-invertebrates, Nesting 1 Comment »
Contributed by KC Tsang
Common Tailorbird's food menu On 10th September 2008, KC Tsang was in the field keeping watch on a pair of Common Tailorbird (Orthotomus sutorius) flying in and out of the nest to feed the chicks. The birds flew to a perch some distance from the nest, looked around, then when all was clear, flew directly to the nest (left). The birds did not pose for him with the food – they moved around fast and KC had to act just as fast, missing many opportunities and spending a total of about three hours in... Read More

Blue Magpie sighted at Mt Faber

15 Sep 2008   in Species No Comments »
Contributed by John Lynn
Blue Magpie sighted at Mt Faber When we posted an account of a Blue Magpie (Urocissa erythrorhyncha) eating a Red-whiskered Bulbul (Pycnonotus jocosus) photographed in Hongkong, John Lynn wrote that he sighted a Blue Magpie in Singapore earlier: “I’ve photographed the Blue Magpie gone feral in the Mt Faber area some time back. Once I saw six in a flight. Hope they don’t breed and give our local bulbuls a hard time. “…but only managed to capture this one picture. I was on the spur of Mt... Read More

Nesting of the Olive-winged Bulbul

14 Sep 2008   in Nesting No Comments »
Contributed by Charlene Yeong & Lucia Meijer
Nesting of the Olive-winged Bulbul Charlene Yeong, Conservation and Research Officer of the Singapore Zoological Gardens, sent in a series of images showing the nesting progress of a pair of Olive-winged Bulbul (Pycnonotus plumosus). The nest was built at the top of a potted dracaena plant next to her work desk. The first time she noticed the nesting birds with an egg was on 14th July 2008. Two days later there was another egg. The first egg hatched on the 28th July while the second the next day (below).... Read More

Oriental whip snake having Olive-backed Sunbird for lunch

13 Sep 2008   in Feeding-vertebrates 10 Comments »
Contributed by Johnny Wee
Oriental whip snake having Olive-backed Sunbird for lunch Johnny Wee recently documented an oriental whip snake (Ahaetulla prasina) catching and swallowing an Olive-backed Sunbird (Cinnyris jugularis). The catch was fast and sudden. Once firmly clasped between the jaws of the snake, there was no escape for the bird. Not even a struggle. Next was the slow process of swallowing the bird. The snake took nearly an hour to completely swallow the sunbird. The oriental whip snake is common around vegetation in rural and urban areas... Read More

Mandarin Duck sighted by a canal

12 Sep 2008   in Species No Comments »
Contributed by Meibao
Mandarin Duck sighted by a canal Meibao was walking to the bus stop opposite the National University of Singapore Bukit Timah campus after a walk at the Botanic Gardens at about 4pm on 29th August 2008 when he saw a duck in the canal. “ I think it’s a female mandarin duck. The guide book did not list Singapore as a country I can expect to see it, so could it be an escapee from Jurong Bird park? It was standing by the water, but I did not see it attempt to find food. At one point, the duck stood on... Read More

Slim Sreedharan: Field ornithologist extraordinarie

11 Sep 2008   in Reports, Travel-Personality 7 Comments »
Contributed by YC
Slim Sreedharan: Field ornithologist extraordinarie Slim Sreedharan is a field ornithologist who has been working in the jungles of Borneo for the past two decades and more. *When he was invited by the Sarawak government in 1985 to make a survey of the birds of the Bako National Park, he practically knew nothing about the birds of Borneo. Armed with the only book with illustrations available then, The Birds of Borneo by BE Smythies, he found that the birds “defied identification”. The illustrations as well as the... Read More