• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Siberian Stonechat

08 Jan 2009   in Migration-Migrants, Species No Comments »
Contributed by Lee Tiah Khee
Siberian Stonechat Lee Tiah Khee photographed a male Siberian Stonechat (Saxicola maura) in November 2008. This is another rare winter visitor and passage migrant. Usually, one to two are recorded per year. The earliest reported sighting is 17th October and the latest is 28 April. This post is a cooperative effort between www.naturepixels.org and BESG to bring the study of bird behaviour through photography to a wider... Read More

An encounter with a Siberian Blue Robin

08 Jan 2009   in Feathers-maintenance, Migration-Migrants No Comments »
Contributed by Adrian Lim
An encounter with a Siberian Blue Robin Adrian Lim a.k.a. wmw998 describes his encounter with a juvenile male Siberian Blue Robin taking a bath on 15th December 2008 in Malaysia (above): “This is an unusual way of shooting this bird, at least for me. Based on friend’s information, me and Alagan travelled all the way to Pahang jungle. Knowing that the bird would only be out to shower between 5pm to 7 pm, we trekked up the dark mountain stream, settled ourselves in the middle of the stream at 4.45 pm, with... Read More

Malayan Night Heron sighted in Singapore’s Bidadari

07 Jan 2009   in Heron-Egret-Bittern, Migration-Migrants No Comments »
Contributed by KC Tsang
Malayan Night Heron sighted in Singapore’s Bidadari KC Tsang did it again. On 30th December 2008 he sighted a Malayan Night Heron (Gorsachius melanolophus) at his favourite birding ground, Bidadari. And photographed it. “I would like to report a sighting of the Malayan Night Heron at Bidadari Cemetery, picture taken this morning. It really gave me a hard time, making me run all over the place in my effort to get a decent picture. “As I am writing this posting, photographers are already converging on the place… This... Read More

Red-bearded Bee-eater feeding chicks

Red-bearded Bee-eater feeding chicks In November 2008, S K Foo was at the Panti Forest Reserve in nearby Johor, Malaysia to document a pair of Red-bearded Bee-eater (Nyctyornis amictus) feeding their chicks. “…a larger species of bee-eaters. I would never dream of photographing this species as they are rather elusive, feeding mainly on insects and bees that are caught in flight from perches concealed in foliage. They were found in lower part of the forest as they were nesting. They constantly returned with... Read More

Pheasant-tailed Jacana at Sungei Buloh

06 Jan 2009   in Migration-Migrants No Comments »
Contributed by Mendis Tan & Lee Tiah Khee
Pheasant-tailed Jacana at Sungei Buloh On 15th December 2008, Mendis Tan posted an image of the Pheasant-tailed Jacana (Hydrophasianus chirurgus) taken at the Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve, saying, “Sharing a bird that has not been seen at SBWR for a few years already. We think it is quite lost because this bird is a freshwater species.” Similarly, Lee Tiah Khee shared his image of the bird at the same time: “What a big surprise! This Pheasant-Tailed Jacana has landed SBWR, my best christmas grift so... Read More

House Swift in the act of drinking water

06 Jan 2009   in Miscellaneous 1 Comment »
Contributed by Lin Yangchen
House Swift in the act of drinking water “Unlike Merops philippinus (Blue-tailed Bee-eater), Alcedo atthis (Common Kingfisher), Halcyon capensis (Stork-billed Kingfisher), Hirundo 
tahitica (Pacific Swallow) et al., apodids (swifts) do not seem to dive into water. It could be
 because their more rigid wings, as observed in flight, are not so amenable to generating the vertical thrust needed for leaving the
 water surface. They were never designed to take off from the ground into the air in the first place,... Read More

Eyebrowed Thrush at Bidadari

05 Jan 2009   in Migration-Migrants No Comments »
Contributed by KC Tsang
Eyebrowed Thrush at Bidadari K C Tsang on 6th December 2008, sent in this note and the image above: “This morning’s birding yielded this uncommon passage migrant at Bidadari Cemetery, the Eyebrowed Thrush (Turdus obscurus). “At first I was not able to ID the fellow. On seeing the picture G Sreedharan came to the conclusion that it is a thrush, but what? So back to the car, out came the books… it was the Eyebrowed Thrush. “Regret that we were not able to get more pictures for... Read More

What happened to the Grey Heron nesting colony?

05 Jan 2009   in Heron-Egret-Bittern, Nesting-failed No Comments »
Contributed by TC
What happened to the Grey Heron nesting colony? In November 2008, TC chanced upon an active heronry in the north of Singapore. It was the incessant noise of the birds that attracted his attention. The casuarinas trees (Casuarina equisetifolia) were covered with Grey Herons (Ardea cinerea), many sitting in their nests, others perching on branches nearby (above). The herons were in their breeding colours – their legs and bill were distinctly orange to reddish (below). TC returned a few times to the site to monitor... Read More

Northern Shoveler sighted at Sungei Buloh

04 Jan 2009   in Migration-Migrants 1 Comment »
Contributed by G Sreedharan & David Tan
Northern Shoveler sighted at Sungei Buloh David Tan alerted everyone on the appearance of a female Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata) at the Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve (SBWR) on 27th December 2008. G Sreedharan was also there and sent in this report: “When I arrived at SBWR late saturday afternoon, most people had left. The Northern Shoveler had moved to the pool left of the main hide and was moving around and possible feeding in the open between some egrets, except that it was quite a distance away. “After... Read More

Comfort behaviour of the Lineated Barbet

04 Jan 2009   in Comfort behaviour, Feathers-maintenance No Comments »
Contributed by Michael Ho
Comfort behaviour of the Lineated Barbet Michael Ho a.k.a. nemo posted two images of the Lineated Barbet (Megalaima lineata) indulging in comfort behaviour on 15th November 2008 that he is sharing with us. The barbet was caught stretching its wings in a sort of an “angel” posture (above left) and preening the feathers at the base of its left wing, turning its head around to get at a difficult spot (above right). We have been showcasing the comfort behaviour of a number of birds recently: Blue-tailed Bee-eater... Read More