• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Javan Mynas Anting With Millipedes

26 Jul 2015   in Feathers-maintenance 4 Comments »
Contributed by Kwong Wai Chong
Javan Mynas Anting With Millipedes “From Wikipedia, anting is a self-nointing behaviour during which birds rub insects, usually ants, on their feathers and skin. The bird may pick up the insects in their bill and rub them on the body, or the bird may lie in an area of high density of the insects and perform dust bathing-like movements. The insects secrete liquids containing chemicals such as formic acid, which can act as an insecticide, miticide, fungicide, or bactericide. Thus, anting is way of reducing... Read More

Peregrine Falcon having a dust-bath in a high-rise apartment

25 Jul 2015   in Feathers-maintenance, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by Wong Weng Fai
Peregrine Falcon having a dust-bath in a high-rise apartment In July 2015 Wong Weng Fai photographed a Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) having a dust-bath on the balcony floor of a yet to be completed apartment in a high-rise building. Many birds keep their feathers in good condition by taking dust-bath LINK. They lie on the dusty ground and moves vigorously about to get the dirt particles onto their feathers. This helps to get rid of ectoparasites as well as stale secretions from their oil glands. In the case of this falcon, it... Read More

Black-winged Stilt feeding on molluscs and fish

24 Jul 2015   in Feeding-invertebrates, Feeding-vertebrates, Waders No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Black-winged Stilt feeding on molluscs and fish The local information on the prey of the Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus) is limited. On 2nd March 2013, Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS noticed a family unit of three taking many snails in a short period of observation at the Malim Nawar Wetlands in Perak, Malaysia (above, below). This is an extensive ex-tin mining area covered with pond, lakes, wetlands and fish farming units. The snails are foraged in ‘knee deep’ water and swallowed whole. On 28th... Read More

© Go Carambolas With Wild Birds in Sepilok – N.Borneo

23 Jul 2015   in Feeding-plants No Comments »
Contributed by Daisy O’Neill
© Go Carambolas With Wild Birds in Sepilok - N.Borneo “A tropical, succulent fruit when matured grows to about 10cm in length. When ripened, tastes sweet with an astringent finish. Shaped like a 5-pointed star when sliced cross-sectioned, is known to locals as Starfruit (Averrhoa carambola) and is also commercially grown (left). “When left unplucked in private fruit gardens or orchard, ripen fruits become hosts to several species of birds. Some were observed to peck and swallow its flesh, some chewed to extract its... Read More

WHITE-CRESTED LAUGHINGTHRUSH – PREENING

22 Jul 2015   in Feathers-maintenance, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by Dr. Leong Tzi Ming
WHITE-CRESTED LAUGHINGTHRUSH – PREENING “On the morning of 14th December 2014, I was strolling beside a pond in a public park when a small flock of White-crested Laughingthrushes (Garrulax leucolophus) caught my attention. They were passing through and paused briefly to preen themselves, while perched on branches overhead (above). “One individual landed beside another and voluntarily offered its services in some hard to reach places, such as the neck region (above). Unfortunately, there seemed to be... Read More

Jungle Myna Acridotheres fuscus – feeding on papaya

21 Jul 2015   in Feeding-plants No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Jungle Myna Acridotheres fuscus - feeding on papaya The papaya (Carica papaya) is commonly planted in many urban gardens as the fruits are a favourite with many people. And if your are a little late in harvesting the ripe fruits, birds will beat you to them. So far we have documented more than a dozen species of birds eating the fruit – check out this LINK, type “papaya” in the “search” box to get to the list. The birds documented in this website include barbet, bulbul, cockatoo, corella, dove, hornbill, koel,... Read More

© Go Bananas With Wild Birds at Sepilok – N. Borneo

20 Jul 2015   in Feeding-plants No Comments »
Contributed by Daisy O'Neill
© Go Bananas With Wild Birds at Sepilok - N. Borneo “A recent, late June- early July 2015 revisit to Sepilok in Sabah (N. Borneo), after an absence of five year rotation visit, saw many changes in development, depletion in bird population and the psyche of Sabahans. “Even Mother Nature, under constant duress from human follies, shook and quake-shuddered in disapproval. Her anger recently took off one of its iconic ‘donkey’s ears’ at Mt. Kinabalu and claimed many precious lives. Surely it is a sign from... Read More

Avian Non-verbal communication

19 Jul 2015   in Miscellaneous, Parrots 3 Comments »
Contributed by Jeremy Lee & Dr Eric Tan
Avian Non-verbal communication “I had a strange encounter at a shopping mall in Seoul this morning. “I was walking to the pets section of the supermarket not unlike our pet lovers chain here in Singapore. “I have a 4 month old cockatiel at home and we are all very close to it and I always have a look at birds section of all the pet shop I pass by. “This enclosure had a sliding front glass pane access. Inside was a pair of cockatiels and Pied Kakariki [also known as Red-fronted Parakeet or... Read More

Eurasian Tree-sparrow: A juicy bite, then a bath

18 Jul 2015   in Feathers-maintenance, Feeding-invertebrates No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Eurasian Tree-sparrow: A juicy bite, then a bath “One of my favourite birds is the Eurasian Tree-sparrow (Passer montanus malaccensis). “Here seen having a juicy bite (above) and then a nice bath (below).” Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS Ipoh, Perak, Malaysia 8th July 2015 Location: 1600m ASL, Cameron Highlands, Malaysia Habitat: Public road in the... Read More

EMPEROR OVIPOSITING

17 Jul 2015   in Dragonflies-Damselflies, Fauna, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by Dr. Leong Tzi Ming
EMPEROR OVIPOSITING You can view the Emperor mating HERE. “In November 2014, I was thrilled by the appearance of Emperor dragonflies (Anax guttatus, family Aeshnidae) as they performed their antics at a local pond. My heart raced with excitement whenever a female arrived onto the scene, as there would be opportunity to witness her ovipositing behaviour if she had already mated. “Using her blade-like ovipositor, the female may deposit her eggs into a variety of receptacles, including: …a... Read More