• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Asian Glossy Starlings gathering on the ground

17 Nov 2014   in Miscellaneous No Comments »
Contributed by Subaraj Rajathurai & YC Wee
Asian Glossy Starlings gathering on the ground On some evening when the Asian Glossy Starling (Aplonis panayensis) were gathering in trees and palms around my area LINK prior to moving on to their main roosting trees, 40-50 mainly juveniles were seen gathering on the ground of my neighbour’s garden (above). According to Subaraj Rajathurai, “Though Asian Glossy Starlings come more readily to the ground to feed on human food, it is unusual for a large flock to gather on the ground. At this time of the year these... Read More

Mixed foraging party at Cameron Highlands, Malaysia

16 Nov 2014   in Feeding strategy No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Mixed foraging party at Cameron Highlands, Malaysia On 1st Ocrober 2014, Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS encountered a mixed species foraging party at 1,600m ASL Cameron Highlands, Pahang, Malaysia. The habitat, a clearing adjacent to primary forest Species participating in the mixed foraging party: 1. A pair of Bar-winged Flycatcher-shrikes (Hemipus picatus intermedius) (above, with prey). 2. A few Mountain Fulvettas (Alcippe peracensis) were seen feeding on fruit (above). 3. A few Yellow-rumped Flycatchers (Ficedula... Read More

©Meet Six Bulbul Species Foraging Berries – Callicarpa glabrifolis

15 Nov 2014   in Feeding-plants 1 Comment »
Contributed by Daisy O’Neill & Januarie Kulis
©Meet Six Bulbul Species Foraging Berries - Callicarpa glabrifolis “A revisit to Lambir Hills (Approx.465m a.s.l.), Sarawak in August, 2014 with a seasonal difference did not disappoint me. “The highlight of the birding trip turned out to be – a three metre tall bush, roundish in contour with green, luscious heart-shaped foliages. The mature bush planted in vicinity of Park Headquarters’ compound was crowned with a profusion of clustered berries in three stages of coloured maturity- green, white and black. “Here dripping in... Read More

Bats in my porch: 21. Hanging CDs

14 Nov 2014   in Fauna, Videography 9 Comments »
Contributed by YC Wee
Bats in my porch: 21. Hanging CDs A colony of Common Fruit Bats (Cynopterus brachyotis) had been roosting in my porch since 2006 LINK. In 2014 I got tired of the mess the bats left behind and decided to find ways to get rid of the colony. First I installed a pair of powerful spotlights LINK. This was followed by placing Compact Discs on the floor to reflect light onto the bats above. This worked initially but not for long LINK 1 and LINK 2. Along the way I found that turning on the spotlights in the late... Read More

Little Spiderhunter – nectar feeding and sexing

13 Nov 2014   in Feeding-plants, Morphology-Develop. No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Little Spiderhunter  – nectar feeding and sexing “Had an opportunity to watch an adult Little Spiderhunter (Arachnothera longirostra cinereicollis) at close range for an extended period with lots of images. “This spiderhunter feeds on the flower nectar of Papaya (Carica papaya) (top) and Banana (Musa sp.) (above). “Posting this image (above, below) as it show the underside of wing and pectoral region. There are varying opinions about sexing in this species summarised below” 1. Wells (2007) The birds of the... Read More

YELLOW-BARRED FLUTTERER MATING

12 Nov 2014   in Fauna, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by Dr. Leong Tzi Ming
YELLOW-BARRED FLUTTERER MATING “While exploring a local lotus pond in September 2014, I was delighted by the diversity of dragonfly inhabitants, including the Yellow-barred Flutterer (Rhyothemis phyllis, family Libellulidae). When not floating and flying around, they would perch briefly on the lotus plants (above). “Video clips of these dragonflies at home and at ease in their pond habitat may be previewed below: “Although this is a rather common and widespread species, we rarely get... Read More

All bees visiting flowers of Singapore Rhododendron must indulge in “buzz pollination”

11 Nov 2014   in Fauna No Comments »
Contributed by YC Wee
All bees visiting flowers of Singapore Rhododendron must indulge in "buzz pollination" Singapore Rhododendron (Melastome malabathricum) is a weedy shrub with showy pinkish flowers. Details of the flower parts and some of the fauna associated with the plant have been posted earlier HERE. Most of the time we are aware of the large Carpenter Bees (Xylocopa spp.) visiting the flowers for the nectar and pollen. The image at the top and the video clip above show X. latipes landing heavily on the flowers. By then pollen grains would have covered its body, shot out... Read More

Adult male Lesser Yellownape feeding on fruits

10 Nov 2014   in Feeding strategy, Feeding-plants No Comments »
Contributed by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS
Adult male Lesser Yellownape feeding on fruits “As I mentioned earlier LINK, I observed this Lesser Yellownape (Picus chlorolophus) fruit feeding. “It had been raining for 2 hours and when it stopped the birds were hungry and we observed a number of mixed-foraging parties. “One mixed-foraging party comprised this male Lesser Yellownape with a pair of Little Cuckoo-doves (Macropygia ruficeps), 6-7 Silver-eared Mesias (Leiothrix argentauris), 2 female Yellow-rumped Flycatchers (Ficedula zanthopygia), 1 Asian... Read More

Bats in my porch: 20. When the female rejects the male

09 Nov 2014   in Fauna, Videography 3 Comments »
Contributed by YC Wee
Bats in my porch: 20. When the female rejects the male At the roost, the dominant male Common Fruit Bat (Cynopterus brachyotis) is constantly on the lookout for females in oestrus (above). He will move from one female to another with outstretched wings, regularly flapping them vigorously. Most of the time the female that is being courted hangs from the roost quietly with wings wrapped tightly round her body. Only once in a long while will she groom herself. The male remains in front of the female for as long as 20-30 minutes... Read More

LEOPARD LINGERING ON LOTUS

08 Nov 2014   in Fauna, Videography No Comments »
Contributed by Dr Leong Tzi Ming
LEOPARD LINGERING ON LOTUS The Leopard (Phalanta phalantha phalantha, family Nymphalidae, subfamily Heliconiinae) is a relatively common butterfly species in Singapore and may be found in secondary growth within urban parks and gardens (Khew, 2010). It is known to be restless and skittish, constantly on the move. On the morning of 20th September 2014, I was able to observe an individual of this species in the middle of a lotus pond (top, above). It had landed upon the mature seed pod of the lotus... Read More