• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Plant-Bird Relationship: 4. References

in Plants, References, Reports  on Jul 04, 15 No Comments »
This list is provided to allow the data in the lists of plants LINK and birds LINK to be traced to the original source/s should there be a necessity to do so. Personal communications are listed as “pers. comm.” [feeding on nectar, from left (bird-plant): Crimson Sunbird-Etlingera elatior, Javan Myna-Schefflera actinophylla, Yellow-naped Oriole-Schefflera actinophylla] List of References Amar-Singh, H. S. S., 2009a. Greater green leafbird and others feeding on... Read More

Plant-Bird Relationship: 3. List of Birds

in Plants, References, Reports  on Jul 03, 15 1 Comment »
This list is compiled from the plant list LINK. Under each species of birds are the different plants that they visit for shelter (roost), food (nectar, fruit or insect), nesting materials and nest sites. The birds are listed under their different families and arranged in alphabetical order. Emphasis is given to their common names, followed by their scientific names. Plants are in scientific names. Should there be a necessity to refer to the original source/s, note the plant... Read More

Plant-Bird Relationship: 2. List of plants (version 2.0)

in Plants, References, Reports  on Jul 02, 15 6 Comments »
The 349 species of plants are listed under algae, mosses, lichens, ferns, non-seed and seed plants. Non-seed plants (Gymnosperms) and seed plants (Angiosperms) are further listed under their different families arranged in alphabetical order. Under each plant species are the different species of birds that had been documented visiting it for shelter, food (nectar, fruit or insect), nesting materials and nest sites. References are provided to allow for tracing to their... Read More

Plant-Bird Relationship: 1. Introduction

in Plants, References, Reports  on Jul 01, 15 1 Comment »
Plant-Bird Relationship: 1. Introduction In the next three days we will be making available on this website three major documents on plant-bird relationship. [feeding on nectar, from left (bird-plant): Crimson Sunbird-Etlingera elatior, Javan Myna-Schefflera actinophylla, Yellow-naped Oriole-Schefflera actinophylla] 1. The first is a list of 349 species of plants that birds visit to obtain shelter, food, nest material, nesting site, etc. 2. The second is a list of 230 species of birds. Listed under each bird... Read More

Olive-backed Sunbird collecting fruits of Porophyllum ruderale (F: Asteraceae)

in Nesting, Plants  on May 08, 15 No Comments »
Olive-backed Sunbird collecting fruits of Porophyllum ruderale (F: Asteraceae) On 18th April 2015 Thong Chow Ngian photographed a female Olive-backed Sunbird (Nectarinia jugularis) harvesting nesting material at Ponggol Barat grassland. The sunbird was working its way from the top to the bottom of the approximately half a metre tall shrub (above). With its bill full of dried fruits (above, below), it flew off to its secret nesting site. The sunbird returned to the same shrub several times to gather more dried fruits. It was so engrossed with the... Read More

Animals attracted to the Banana inflorescence

in Fauna, Plants, Videography  on Feb 22, 15 No Comments »
Animals attracted to the Banana inflorescence The image above shows two banana plants (Musa ‘Cavindish’), each with a fully developed inflorescence branch. The upper portion bears developing fruits from female flowers. The plant in the foreground has a length of bare branch below the fruit bunches. This portion bore male flowers that subsequently fall off. At the bottom of the branch is a compact, teardrop-shaped inflorescence bud that will continue to give rise to male flowers – see HERE for details... Read More

Plantain Squirrel eats Aristolochia acuminata fruit

in Fauna, Plants  on Feb 14, 15 3 Comments »
Plantain Squirrel eats Aristolochia acuminata fruit One morning in early December 2014, I was attracted to the loud cries of a pair of Plantain Squirrels, also known as Common Red-bellied Squirrel (Callosciurus notatus singapurensis). The squirrels were in different trees about 10 metres or more from each other. Whether they were mating or territorial cries, I do not know. But the cries went on for quite a few minutes. One of the squirrels was at the top of my Noni tree (Morinda citrifolia). Initially I thought it was eating... Read More

A closer look at Cave Nectar Bats visiting banana flowers

in Fauna, Plants, Videography  on Feb 07, 15 No Comments »
A closer look at Cave Nectar Bats visiting banana flowers Two earlier posts documented the visits by Cave Nectar Bats (Eonycteris spelaea) to banana flowers (Musa cultivars) for their nectar LINK 1 and LINK 2. The bat usually circles around the plant before landing on the flowers. It uses its sharp claw at the end of each thumb to cling onto the inflorescence bud. It then proceeds to probe into the flowers (above). This involves pushing its narrow snout between the two perianths (the larger upper and the smaller lower to get at... Read More

Bats and the two banana plants that were flowering: Part 2

in Fauna, Feeding-plants, Plants  on Jan 27, 15 No Comments »
Bats and the two banana plants that were flowering: Part 2 An early post showed that Cave Nectar Bats (Eonycteris spelaea) prefer male banana flowers that were found at the lower end of the inflorescence branch than the female flowers found at the upper portion LINK. Less than a week later, the older banana plant (Musa ‘Cavendish”) had begun putting forth only male flowering hands (above). The younger plant bearing the newly inflorescence branch had by then gone through a few hands of female flowers (below). Observations were... Read More

Octopus Stinkhorn fungus

in Plants, Videography  on Jan 26, 15 No Comments »
Octopus Stinkhorn fungus “The Octopus Stinkhorn Fungus a.k.a. Devil’s claws and Witches’ claws (Anthurus archeri formerly Clathrus archeri) is endemic to Australia and New Zealand. It has however spread to Europe and America since the first World War, possibly due to the spores riding on artillery machinery and grass bales for horse feeds. “We came across this population of stinkhorns when we thought that we were taking a closer look at some fallen flowers. On approaching... Read More