• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Nesting of the Rufescent Prinia

in Nesting, Nests, Vocalisation  on Mar 08, 14 No Comments »
Nesting of the Rufescent Prinia “The Rufescent Prinia (Prinia rufescens extrema) is unusual in that it makes a nest very much like that of tailorbirds. I noticed a pair carrying prey and, after some time of observation, managed to locate the nest. (Above is an overview of the nest.) “They had built a nest on a slope along the logging trail, 0.5-0.6 meters above ground. The nest used two leaves stitched together with silk (spider web) used to plug holes. Some of the silk was stretched and pulled into... Read More

Common Iora nesting

in Nesting, Nests  on Jan 06, 14 No Comments »
Common Iora nesting “Spotted this Common Iora (Aegithina tiphia horizoptera) nest by the way an adult bird flew into the tree (above, below). It suggested nesting rather than looking for prey. “The nest was built ~ 2.4 meters up in a small fork in the branch. It is compact nest and one of the best constructed that we have seen. “Both parents tended/incubated the eggs (female incubating above and the male below). While the female was incubating the male was foraging less that 10 meters... Read More

Welcome Swallow uses Maned Duck’s feathers to line nest

“In November 2013, we were having our lunch in a sheltered area of Eyre Gardens, Albany, West Australia when a pair of welcome swallows (Hirundo neoxena) kept swooping around us and landing on a ledge under the roof. Splotches of white stains could be seen on the floor. This piqued our curiosity and we found a nest built on a ledge under the roof. Four young chicks with very wide mouths were clearly visible. “A few feathers stuck upright to the nest and waving... Read More

Sex and the Birds: 9. Polygyny and Baya Weavers

in Nests, Sex  on Dec 16, 13 No Comments »
The Baya Weavers (Ploceus philippinus) nest in colonies where their retort-shaped nests hang from the ends of branches. This provides limited security from predators, as invariably the nests will be shaken with any intrusion. Many nests are built near existing bees, wasps and hornet nests LINK 1 and LINK 2. The male builds more than one nest (above, below left). Before a nest is completed, he courts the female. The female will inspect the semi-completed nest usually at the... Read More

© MY ODYSSEY WITH BLUE-WINGED PITTAS PART 13: Nest rebuilding

in Nests  on Nov 24, 13 No Comments »
© MY ODYSSEY WITH BLUE-WINGED PITTAS PART 13: Nest rebuilding “I returned to site the evening of 31st May, 2013 to reconcile my nest observation loss that ended abruptly. Listening to the distressing call of a parenting bird, having lost its chicks was equally heart wrenching. “I gave the next day a miss. While still feeling hard to let go, I decided to revisit the same location the morning of 2nd June. “The unmistakable calls of a Blue-winged Pitta (Pitta moluccensis) rang from the forest. They sounded with more... Read More

© MY ODYSSEY WITH BLUE-WINGED PITTAS PART 12: Nest Analysis and Measurement

in Nests  on Nov 20, 13 2 Comments »
© MY ODYSSEY WITH BLUE-WINGED PITTAS PART 12: Nest Analysis and Measurement “I returned next morning for more photography and documentation of predated nest, since there hasn’t been any nest measurement records made available in text to my knowledge. It was a rain free night. “All photographs taken that morning were hand-held, close- up shots. “This is the first morning photograph taken of the predated nest, the way left the evening before (below left). “The nest was located in secondary mixed forest suspended in... Read More

© MY ODYSSEY WITH BLUE-WINGED PITTAS PART 8: Monitoring Approach to Parenting

in Nests  on Oct 29, 13 No Comments »
© MY ODYSSEY WITH BLUE-WINGED PITTAS PART 8: Monitoring Approach to Parenting Measurement: (1metre=3.28feet); Optics: Fieldscope+ eyepiece x30M +FSBracket+ Digital Camera Binoculars 8×32 “I re-entered forest in between parenting bird feeds with more camouflage drapes, pegs and set up a selected hideout, where best view could be had amongst forest vegetation (below left). “I set myself an imaginary ‘NO GO’ zone perimeter semi-circumference of no less than 20ft (6metres) radius from nest site for hand shot as seen in this image,... Read More

Nest of the Rufous Woodpecker

in Nests  on Sep 14, 13 3 Comments »
Nest of the Rufous Woodpecker “It is well known that woodpeckers are peckers of wood; chiselling into wood for food. Most woodpeckers possess strong beaks that are also used to excavate holes in trees for nests. But for the Rufous Woodpecker (Micropternus brachyurus), I just found out that its nest is excavated within the nest of acrobat ants (Crematogaster sp.). That is amazing because it also preys on the ants. But do you believe that both woodpecker and ants can co-exist during the bird’s... Read More

PACIFIC SWALLOW – NESTING UNDER JETTY

in Fauna, Nests  on Jul 09, 13 No Comments »
PACIFIC SWALLOW – NESTING UNDER JETTY “On 20th June 2013, we were exploring the seaward end of the jetty at Kampung Paya, Pulau Tioman, West Malaysia, when we chanced upon a nest of the Pacific Swallow (Hirundo tahitica). It was situated underneath the jetty and created in a corner, well protected from the elements (above). “From its perch, the swallow had lovely views of the clear waters below, teeming with schools of small fish (above). It would thus be able to witness the exciting hunting... Read More

Copper-throated Sunbird nest-building

in Nests, Sunbirds, Videography  on May 30, 13 No Comments »
Copper-throated Sunbird nest-building “The female Copper-throated Sunbird (Nectarinia calcostetha) is commonly seen at Sungei Buloh Wetlands Reserve during nest-building season, busy harvesting and ferrying nesting material to her nest (above). This one made at least a dozen trips to a Funnel-web/Tent Spider’s (Beccari’s Tent Spider? LINK web during the 15mins I was watching her, tugging at the web to pull off small bits which she transported to her nearby nest 10m away. “On the left is... Read More