• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Atypical nesting of the Zebra Dove

in Nesting, Pigeon-Dove  on Nov 01, 14 1 Comment »
Atypical nesting of the Zebra Dove “I have seen Zebra Doves (Geopelia striata) nest in odd sites but never before in limestone hill openings. “Note that these are images and observations from a distance with no closer access but there is no doubt about the nesting behaviour. “I spotted an adult flying into a small hole in a large limestone stalactite. The hole is located 40-50 meters up a limestone outcropping (above). I saw three visits by the adult bringing nesting material with another adult within... Read More

Asian Glossy Starling: 1. Claiming roof space

Asian Glossy Starling: 1. Claiming roof space The soft boards sealing the strip of roof projecting from my neighbour’s house fell off some months ago at two points. I expected either Javan Myna (Acridotheres javanicus) or Asian Glossy Starling (Aplonis panayensis) would claim these roof areas for nesting. But for weeks there was no sign of any of these birds entering the spaces. Then, in the afternoon of 11th June 2014 I happened to notice an adult Asian Glossy Starling flying right through that first gap. It... Read More

Oriental Pied Hornbill nesting

in Hornbills, Nesting  on Sep 11, 14 1 Comment »
Oriental Pied Hornbill nesting “I saw an adult Oriental Pied Hornbill (Anthracoceros albirostris) sitting patiently in a tree (above) and suspected nesting. I went round to the other side of the trunk and found a recently walled up nest – note the mud still on the tip of the female’s beak (below). “The nest was located in a huge old tree, 9-10 meters up (below). While in the location, some villages came up to me and we had a chat regarding the nesting pair. They say this is the... Read More

Raffles’s Malkoha nesting and calls

in Nesting, Vocalisation  on Sep 08, 14 No Comments »
Raffles's Malkoha nesting and calls “I went fairly deep into this forest reserve to get some rest and spotted a female Raffles’s Malkoha (Phaenicophaeus chlorophaeus) bringing prey to juveniles (above). Prey was a large winged insect. “The nest is located 11-12 meters, high up in the crown of large tree (below). The nest may appear very high to us but I was on an old logging trail on the slope of a hill. Hence from the bird’s perspective the crown is easily reached from the vegetation on the top... Read More

Insights To Blue-winged Pittas Part 5

in Nesting  on Sep 03, 14 2 Comments »
Insights To Blue-winged Pittas Part 5 Nesting: “Previous observations and images suggest excavation of nesting site commenced on 21st May 2014. It was carried out mainly by the female at Itam Dalam Forest Reserve (IDFR). “Ticky and Tippy, the pair of Blue-winged Pittas (Pitta moluccensis) continued foraging and discreetly they were seen collecting nesting materials at intervals (below left). “My presence was well tolerated by Ticky- the male. He responded frequently to my whistle calls and at times flew... Read More

Pink-necked Green-pigeon uses abandoned munia’s nest

in Nesting  on Aug 14, 14 No Comments »
Pink-necked Green-pigeon uses abandoned munia’s nest On 5th August 2014, we received through the courtesy of Lee Chiu San, two images taken by Mark Lim of Khoo Teck Phuat Hospital in Yishun Central, Singapore. Mark spotted a male Pink-necked Green-pigeon (Treron vernans) sitting quietly on its nest outside the hospital’s food court on 1st August 2014. A few days later, Mark spotted two chicks sitting beside the adult. As with pigeons and doves, the male usually incubates the eggs and broods the chicks during the daylight... Read More

An eggshell in the garden…

in Nesting  on Aug 02, 14 No Comments »
An eggshell in the garden… Every now and then I stumbled upon an eggshell in my garden (above). The shell is light blue on the outside and white on the inside. Obviously it is from the egg of the Javan Myna (Acridotheres javanicus). It is common knowledge that incubating birds remove eggshells immediately after hatching and dispose them some distance away. Fresh eggshells lying below nests will attract predators, especially when the white inner surface reflects light. I have personally observed such... Read More

Glossy Swiftlet collects lichen as nesting material

in Nesting, Swifts-Swallows  on Jul 27, 14 No Comments »
Glossy Swiftlet collects lichen as nesting material Samson Tan photographed Glossy Swiftlets (Collocalia esculenta) flying around the garden of a resort when holidaying in Tomohon, Sulawesi, Indonesia in June 2014. Only when he uploaded the images onto his computer did he realise that the swiftlets were actively collecting lichens growing from the trunk of a palm. A swiftlet would slow down (above) and hovered about 50cm away from the palm (below). It then approached the trunk of the palm without making any physical contact... Read More

Nesting of the Common Iora: 2. Incubation

in Nesting  on Jul 23, 14 No Comments »
Nesting of the Common Iora: 2. Incubation “I recently posted a pair of Common Ioras (Aegithina tiphia horizoptera) collecting spider web for their nest LINK. They are nesting in our immediate home environment and hence observations have become easy and frequent. “They laid eggs on 9th May and I have been keeping a close eye as incubation and fledging periods are unreported locally (Wells 2007). This is a preliminary report from 9-20th May. The minimum observations in a day are 8 and often observations are... Read More

Green-billed Malkoha – nest building

in Nesting, Videography  on Jul 16, 14 1 Comment »
Green-billed Malkoha – nest building “Spotted a Green-billed Malkoha (Phaenicophaeus tristis longicaudatus) building a nest and harvesting twigs from a nearby dead tree (above, below). Only one adult was seen involved in nest building. “The nest was located in the fork of a young Rain Tree (Albizia saman) approximately 4 meters above the ground level (below). The tree is overgrown with creepers and the nest itself is located in a dense part of these creepers. Besides the twigs, fresh leaves were also... Read More