• Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    Water(hen) in the (bird) brain

    “Our good web-master once posted an article of mine on this website about attracting kingfishers to urban gardens LINK. “As a follow-up to that, I decided to do this...

  • The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    The Birds of Singapore – an online book

    In May 1943, GC Madoc published “An Introduction to Malayan Birds.” He wrote his manuscript in Singapore’s Changi Prison where he was interned when the country fell into the...

  • Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    Videocam: A powerful tool for studying birds

    1. Collecting birds: In the 19th century the equipment needed to study birds was the gun. Another skill necessary was a good stuffing technique in order to preserve the specimens....

  • Documenting bird calls and songs

    Documenting bird calls and songs

    Many local birdwatchers are able to recognise the birds behind the songs. However, interest in most cases ends there except for a few who make basic recordings. Erik Mobrand...

  • Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    Should attempts be made to tame wild birds?

    The first part of the series by aviculturist Lee Chiu San deals with whether birds can be tamed and whether they will remain tamed. The second part looks at whether it is...

  • Postings your observations and images

    Postings your observations and images

    Why should you post your observations and images? Southeast Asian birds are poorly studied in terms of behaviour and ecology. By posting your observations (and this include...

  • Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    Nature Society: The struggle for Singapore’s nature areas

    The above paper has just been published. Nature in Singapore is a peer-reviewed, online journal that publishes articles on the flora and fauna (e.g., biology, botany, zoology,...

Black-shouldered Kite regurgitation or vomiting?

in Miscellaneous, Raptors  on May 14, 15 No Comments »
Black-shouldered Kite regurgitation or vomiting? On 21st April 2015, Melinda Chan sent in two images of a juvenile Black-shouldered Kite (Elanus caeruleus) photographed by Chan Yoke Meng (above, below). The kite was on a high perch spewing a sticky substance. There were two other juvenile kites on the same tree. They had a flock of Red-breasted Parakeets (Psittacula alexandri) as well as a single Hahn’s Macaw for company. Was the kite regurgitating or vomiting? According to the literature, regurgitation is part of... Read More

Barred Buttonquail – female “bluffing behaviour”

in Miscellaneous  on May 06, 15 No Comments »
Barred Buttonquail – female “bluffing behaviour” “I accidently surprised this female Barred Buttonquail (Turnix suscitator atrogularis). She responded by turning, looking straight at me with a piercing look, fluffing up the plumage as well as bowing down repeatedly, lifting up the back. This went on for about 30-40 seconds. Although I was near the bird, I was imaging her through some undergrowth so videos were difficult. “The last time I posted this behaviour Hans Peeters was kind enough to comment:... Read More

Follow BESG on Facebook…

in Miscellaneous  on Apr 02, 15 No Comments »
Follow BESG on Facebook… All along we have been using YahooGroups (BESGroup, pigeon-holes and nature-singapore) to communicate with members – mainly to inform them of our postings. Now, thanks to Amelia Yeo, we have a Facebook page – LINK. Anyone who has been following our daily postings would have known that we give priority to issues of bird ecology, especially bird behavior and the inter-dependency of birds, plants and other faunal groups like mammals, amphibians, reptiles, insects,... Read More

Chestnut-backed Scimitar-babbler: Opinion solicited on this behaviour

in Miscellaneous  on Mar 31, 15 2 Comments »
Chestnut-backed Scimitar-babbler: Opinion solicited on this behaviour On 30th March 2015, Simon van der Meulen wrote to Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS” about an unusual behavior of a Chestnut-backed Scimitar-babbler (Pomatorhinus montanus) that he documented in Thailand: “I recently visited the Hala Bala WLS in South Thailand; I was actually a few hundred meters from the Malaysian border. There we encountered a Chestnut-backed Scimitar-babbler and I’m somewhat struggling to understand its initial display as shown in enclosed picture. As it... Read More

NATIONAL BUTTERFLY Campaign: It’s time to VOTE for our National Butterfly

NATIONAL BUTTERFLY  Campaign: It’s time to VOTE for our National Butterfly  What better time than Singapore’s 50th year to reflect on our natural heritage? Come 21 Mar 2015, Nature Society (Singapore) or NSS plans to do just that! The National Butterfly campaign will be launched to make the public more aware of the importance of butterflies to the well being of our environment and the need to protect them and their forest habitat where most butterflies live. They will also be educated on current losses and threats to butterflies of Singapore.... Read More

Chan Yoke Meng: Photographer with a mission

Chan Yoke Meng: Photographer with a mission Chan Yoke Meng has a passion for birds. He is not a run-of-the-mill birdwatcher who keeps checklists to tally up the number of species seen. Nor does he maintain a portfolio of bird images in his iPad to show to whoever is interested. To him these are akin to stamp collecting LINK. Meng’s passion is photographing birds. He is not interested in taking portraits of different species. Rather, his focus is documenting bird behaviour. I distinctly remember way back in October... Read More

Great Cormorant waves in Goolwa, South Australia

Great Cormorant waves in Goolwa, South Australia “On a visit to the Sunday market at Goolwa, South Australia we noticed waves of black birds flying up river over the Hindmarsh Island Bridge. We could not identify the birds at a distance so we made our way up the bridge. We were amazed that they were Great Cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo). They flew upriver in endless waves. “We walked across to Hindmarsh Island for a short stroll and a few hours later noticed the birds flying in droves in reverse direction now... Read More

Birding in Taiwan: 10. Taiwan Yuhina

Birding in Taiwan: 10. Taiwan Yuhina “A delightful little Taiwan Yuhina (Yuhina brunneiceps) with elegant crest and facial markings. Common in the highlands and one of the most frequent birds seen in mix foraging parties. We saw it often feeding on berries (nectar in the spring) in flocks of 5-10. “There is some variation in the tone of the breast/underparts. It is described as ‘off white’ or ‘whitish’ with chestnut brown streaks at flanks. But I noticed some birds have light yellow and other a... Read More

Birding in Taiwan: 9. Taiwan Hwamei

Birding in Taiwan: 9. Taiwan Hwamei “An endemic Laughingthrush that is a “secretive resident of scrub, tall grass and forest edge” (Brazil 2009), the Taiwan Hwamei (Garrulax taewanus) is usually found below an altitude of 300 meters but small numbers can extend to an altitude of 1,000 meters ASL (Avifauna of Taiwan, 2nd edition). “This species is classified as Near Threatened on the IUCN red list. It was common in the past but lowland habitat damage and pet bird trade as a singing bird dwindled... Read More

White-breasted Woodswallow in East Malaysia

in Miscellaneous  on Jan 25, 15 No Comments »
White-breasted Woodswallow in East Malaysia “White-breasted Woodswallows (Artamus leucorynchus leucorynchus) are common in East Malaysia (Borneo) but uncommon in West Malaysia. “They are often met soaring or hawking high up on tall trees. “As this was a flat, extensive padi field area with limited perches, this bird was using a sign board very low down to forage from. “It returned quite a number of times to the same perch, very much like some flycatchers, allowing me some closer images.” Dato’ Dr... Read More