More Observations On Red Junglefowl Behaviour (Continued)

“With a large community of Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus) in my condo, ranging from adults to new-born chicks, their presence give me many opportunities to observe their behaviour.

Red Junglefowl Confronts Own Reflection
“There have been many records of different species of birds confronting their own reflections in this website. Here is another one to add to the list (below).

“I was alerted to the episode in the afternoon of 27th September 2013 when family members saw it in the midst of fighting its own image. By the time I caught hold of my camera, the excitement had toned down to mere posturing (below). There was a complaint by a tenant that his car was scratched by the chickens not too long ago. To verify the claim, I went down to check the following day. Some marks were found making the claim appeared to be valid. However, the marks disappeared after a car wash, showing that they were actually dirt marks. The car paint work is tough after all.

Immature Red Junglefowl Attempts To Mate
“The 5 months old immature male (below) was in a flock of 6 similar aged birds foraging at their regular location in the afternoon of 22nd October 2013. It suddenly grabbed an unsuspecting female and attempted to mount her. It was unsuccessful as the female struggled and broke free.

“A rehearsal preparing for the adult life? [Or unsuccessful rape?]

Where Do Red Junglefowl Roost?
“My behaviour in watching the chickens is well known among residents. At times some would ask me where did they come from. I would then point to the sky and smiled. If they showed more interest then I would explain further. There were also some who were surprised when I told them that they could fly. As to the question where do they spend the night, the video recorded on 11th September answers the question. They would spend some time pacing around the trees, strain their necks to look for a good landing point before flying up:

Sun Chong Hong
Singapore
6th November 2013

One Response

  1. […] to take off rapidly to escape danger. Its ability to fly upwards into trees has bee documented on video. However, it is poorly adapted for long […]

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